FYI:Oil Temp

Discussion in 'SRT Hellcat General Discussions' started by VanishingPoint, Feb 22, 2015.

  1. VanishingPoint

    VanishingPoint Silver Member

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    Just an FYI for those of you with the same level of automotive empathy that I have.

    I am a big believer in warming up high performance engines.

    And I noticed that in just 60 degree weather it took a very long time and several miles for the oil temp to get into it's normal operating zone of 190-200 degrees (you can get to the oil temp screen there by using the down arrow on the steering wheel to vehicle, then left / right arrows).

    It really takes longer than most cars because of the way they designed the engine/coolers to shed heat under race loads (particularly oil temps).

    I think it is critical to make sure your oil temps are up before revving and romping on the car, and by then of course, trans, rear and coolant are definitely up to temps.

    Further, I would also consider letting it cool down after a hard run by having the engine running for a bit, or driving it at sane revs/speeds for a minute or two after. Synthetic oil can definitely handle the hotter temps, but for me it is a peace of mind thing. I feel this is a way to really extend the life of your mechanicals.

    As always, YMMV. ;)
     
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  2. 70Cuda

    70Cuda Yep, its got a HEMI

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    Good points, same basic thing my engine builder told be about my '70. It requires more warm up and cool down due to the type of oil and the clearances in the bearings.
     
  3. magnummrk

    magnummrk SRT Hellcat Supporter Gold Supporting Member

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    Great advice!
     
  4. TallCool1

    TallCool1 Gold Member Hellcat Car Club Gold Supporting Member Nat'l Hellcat Tech Advisor HCC Charter Member

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    Right idea but over thinking it. You want some motor internals at near equal temps. Initially that's not the case after engine start certain components take longer to warm then others. Oil takes longer to get to operating temp than the motor internals. Which is why a multi viscosity is recommended so it flows during warm up. Meaning you don't need to wait until oil and engine internal temps equalize. Doing so in a cold environment aka long idle time not healthy for engine.
     
  5. VanishingPoint

    VanishingPoint Silver Member

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    TC1, when the engine is cold it has "0" weight; when warmed up to 160-190 degrees (est), it will be 40 weight.
    Does the engine work when the oil is cold-yes.

    However, I prefer the oil to be at it's proper weight and warmed up fully before I engage rpms past 3K or WOT.

    My M5 specifically had a moving red line based on engine temperature, and I harken that they had it there for a reason.
     
  6. MVT

    MVT Silver Member

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    Why is long idle time not so healthy for the car?
     
  7. TallCool1

    TallCool1 Gold Member Hellcat Car Club Gold Supporting Member Nat'l Hellcat Tech Advisor HCC Charter Member

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    My point was too long at idle not healthy; warm up your car so motor component temperatures equalize (they don't do that at the same time rate and there are thermal expansion differences.) You are concerned about oil's kinetic viscosity during this process which is it's resistance to flow. Multi viscosity oil has a lower kinetic viscosity when it's cold to flow easier and faster. It provides boundary layer lubrication through it's viscosity range. Wait to step on the gas hard until everything is at temp sure. But you can safely drive your car without waiting for oil and motor temps to be equal. You take more risk not waiting for motor component temps to equalize and huge risk pounding on it from cold start.
     
  8. Tannehill

    Tannehill Silver Member

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    This is right up there with the break in procedure. Do it if it makes you feel better, but for the rest of the people who romp on it from day one, they'll have just as good a longevity as the anal retentive crew ;)

    If you were suppose to let the oil warm up as professed by the OP, it would be in the owners manual.
     
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  9. TallCool1

    TallCool1 Gold Member Hellcat Car Club Gold Supporting Member Nat'l Hellcat Tech Advisor HCC Charter Member

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    To illustrate this when I started my car 1st time today it's outside temp indicated 52f. At the 10 minute mark my coolant temp was over 160f, oil temp was almost -40f off coolant temp. Left garage. Drove maybe 12 miles mostly slow speed limits. Took over 22 minutes (from engine start) before oil temp indicated >190f; coolant temp did much sooner. Oil and coolant temp approached equalization (within 4f) around the 25 minute mark. Had I let the car idle to reach close to equalization in that same spread range, it would have taken longer compared to driving when I did. Letting your car idle that long, not good.

    I feel OK driving after coolant temp is 175f+, oil temp will be lower by a sizeable spread. Will I push it hard, no, not until oil temp 190f+. But I will drive and feel engine internals close to equal temps.
     
  10. black06srt8

    black06srt8 Senior Hellcat Member

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    My oil temp at cruising is at 215 is that ok?
     
  11. black06srt8

    black06srt8 Senior Hellcat Member

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    And 80 degrees outside
     
  12. PlumCrazyHellCat

    PlumCrazyHellCat Senior Hellcat Member

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    If you were using conventional oil I would agree with you, but with a synthetic 0w-40 that is designed for temps well below freezing I don't think a warm up period for more than 30 seconds is necessary for just normal driving. I wouldn't dog it until it's warmed up though. As far as a cool down period goes, it doesn't have a turbo on it that would continue to heat the oil after it's turned off, so I wouldn't worry about a cool down period either.
     
  13. Jettster

    Jettster Gold Member Hellcat Car Club

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    My experience and advice given to me was let oil temp get to 140 before running the car hard. We don't really have to worry about cool down as much we are SC and not Turbo. I agree with above that 30 seconds and drive off is fine in warmer temps-maybe a minute in freezing-then wait to play until oil gets over 140. driving the car will get it up to temp way faster than idling and saves fuel as well as reduces fuel and moisture dilution of your oil. Starting up a car and running a short period and shutting off is the worst thing-builds up moisture and fuel in oil and exhaust...
     
  14. cat8you

    cat8you Silver Member

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    I build engines for a living.I start the car back it out of the garage and drive to work.Stay out of the throttle until oil hits 150 then run it to death.We run engines on dyno to 180 water temp,150 oil.Make full pulls at them temps.
     
  15. Steppenwolf

    Steppenwolf VIP Hellcat Member

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    Okay, don't know if this advise would apply to modern Hellcat engines or was just old-school advice passed down from "Dad" regarding treatment of your *average* daily-driver type vehicle, but I thought commonly advised practice was to allow 30-secs to a full minute for oil/fluids to cycle after start-up but before driving off/backing out ... The purpose being not so much for reaching higher fluid temps, but to allow the oil to begin to actually circulate through the engine (and elsewhere).

    ... Or is that just an urban automotive myth?
     

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