Interesting results while working on the subwoofer cabinet in my Challenger HC...

Discussion in 'Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat' started by bolivarshagnasty, Sep 24, 2015.

  1. bolivarshagnasty

    bolivarshagnasty Gold Member

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    I have been fortunate, in that my HK system has sounded pretty damn good since I received. Just today, I removed the subwoofer cabinet from the car and took it into my shop. I was considering what it would take to upgrade the subs. ( a bit muddy on certain heavy base songs) For the record the HK subs ARE 4 ohm, but are wired differently than a typical system. One sub has two plugs going to sub, the other just one. The box is not ported, and the chamber behind the speakers is not partitioned for each speaker. (common space for both subs) I noticed that the box was well reinforced with lots of webbing for strength. What it did NOT have was any damping material in the common chamber. (we used to use fiberglass insulation or egg crate looking foam) I happened to have some egg crate patterned foam in the attic of my shop, so I set the box on top of it and cut and outline of the box out. Installed foam (about 1 1/2" thick) and reassembled subs and cabinet in trunk. Made sure the attachment points for the cabinet were tight. I must say that this seems to have made a significant difference in the clarity of the lows. I played several different types of music with deep lows and I love it. Listening level was 28 to 38. I am satisfied with the system as a whole now, and wouldn't consider changing the subs out. Would love to hear someone else trying this and confirm this is not my imagination. Mostly deaf this evening. Helps when the wife shares how her day went. :D Shag
     
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  2. terryturner

    terryturner Silver Member

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    Is there any way to put in a partition or port the box properly?
     
  3. Kevin M

    Kevin M Silver Member

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    Please post some pics
     
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  4. VanishingPoint

    VanishingPoint Silver Member

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    What does it weigh?
     
  5. bolivarshagnasty

    bolivarshagnasty Gold Member

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    No way to easily partition the box. Porting would be more experimenting and I'm not sure I want to do that.

    I didn't take any pics. Very simple to remove. One plug to the cabinet, one bolt on the left, and the center hold down threaded bolt. (what would be the spare tire hold down)

    The entire cabinet and speakers weigh less than 20 pounds. I was surprised at the light weight of the cabinet. The subs have very small magnets on them. I have always believed that the size of the magnet dictates how hard the subs hit and how much power they will handle. In this case, these hit nearly as hard as a pair of JL Audio 10's that I have in my truck that have a large magnet structure on them and driven with a large Phoenix Gold amp. Remember when we used to run heavy wiring to the subs for power handling capability? All of the wires going to this cabinet look to be 16 gauge or less. At high volume, I can feel the base in the drivers seat and the rear view mirror is vibrating. Increased efficiency with newer design?
     
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  6. Aarcuda

    Aarcuda Gold Member

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    Can audiophiles and causal listeners improve their stereo system by upgrading one of the seemingly simpler components, the speaker wires and connectors? Some companies insist they can. So they offer speaker wire (or cables), sometimes for thousands of dollars that promise better tonality, warmer sound, and richly melodic sound free of grain. But many of these claims are bogus and they create myths surrounding speaker wires. Here are five of them:

    Thicker wires are better: It’s true that for long runs, thicker wires are better at reducing the effects of resistance. But for most set ups (those with speakers within 100 ft of the amplifier), 16-gauge lamp cord is fine. For speakers 100 to 200 ft. from the amp, experts suggest use 14 gauge. And from 200 to 400 ft., they recommend 12-gauge wires. Using extremely thick wire for short runs yields virtually no audible benefit, at least none most people can hear.

    Solving skin effect: It’s true that higher frequency signals tend to travel on a wire’s perimeter while lower-frequencies signals travel near the center. But any effect is only noticeable when dealing with miles of cable and frequencies not used for audio. So don’t waste any money “solving” this problem with intricately braided speaker cables.

    Speaker wires should be the same length: It seems to make sense that speaker wires should be identical to eliminate phase shifts. But electrical signals travel through speaker wire at near the speed of light. It would take miles of speaker wire to hear any difference. So having wires a foot or two (or 10) different is irrelevant.

    Break-in is “critical”: According to some so-called audio experts, the small electrical current passing through speaker wire physically alters the wire enough to create an audible change over time. Not true. Still, companies try to sell wire "cookers" and break-in services to perpetuate this myth and make a buck.

    Splices degrade the sound: Audio experts have determined that properly spliced and soldered wires do not change or degrade the sound coming out of speakers. Although an oscilloscope can detect splices by identifying small voltage drops or spikes, the anomalies are too small to hear. Voltage used for driving speakers is simple voltage, and since regular fluctuations due to program and frequency type occur during normal use, splices produce no adverse audible effect.

    Have you heard any stereo myths you’d like to pass on? Now’s the time.
     
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  7. bolivarshagnasty

    bolivarshagnasty Gold Member

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    Pic of the foam used. Someone else needs to try this and post their opinion of their results.

    foam.jpg
     
  8. Aarcuda

    Aarcuda Gold Member

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    I'll try it
     
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  9. ranger75

    ranger75 Silver Member

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    Ill try it also...gotta go find some of that foam!
     
  10. Bandit

    Bandit Gold Member

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    Subscribing...
     
  11. solo7777

    solo7777 SRT Terminator Hellcat Car Club Western Regional President HCC Charter Member

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    So you put the foam on the bottom of the box, or also on the sides as well?
     
  12. rwhite692

    rwhite692 Silver Member

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    That's a chunk of a foam mattress pad - WalMart item.
     
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  13. Dragon

    Dragon Gold Member

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    im going home to cut a chunk off my bed and install it in the subs.......:eek: sorry honey im cutting your side.

    I think the HK sounds awesome
     
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  14. bolivarshagnasty

    bolivarshagnasty Gold Member

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    Rough cut pattern (1 piece) and installed inside the bottom and sides of the box. Nothing scientific here.
     
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  15. GreenPirate

    GreenPirate SRT Hellcat Supporter Gold Supporting Member

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    I've seen where this sort of foam compresses and mats down permanently. It sort of glues together with permanent compression.
    Then over time it literally disintegrates. Would fiberglass matting work better in the long haul? Just asking.
    GP
     

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