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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I installed the BWoody race heat exchanger and thought I would post a few pics and notes on the install. This is the 3.5" thick version versus the 2" version. I am not going to go through the whole process, just comment on a few things.

First was removing the fascia. You can find videos of this online. I will only add that be sure to remove both sides at the same time. If you pull one side off six inches and then pull the other side, it will break the plastic alignment thingy. The fascia will still line up if this happens, as I think it's more of an assembly thing, but this is how I broke one of them.

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The 3.5" HE is big. We trimmed the fascia by 1" from the outer edge of the HE to maybe 6" inward on both sides, and then had to trim it all the way across as even the middle area would hit.. This has to be done. This also requires that you move the whole lower grill forward about 3/4" or so. You can no longer use the stock mounting points for the grill, so you have to drill new screws in the top. On the bottom of the grill, you can use the four tabs left over on the grill from where it mounted before. Needless to say, it will require trimming, fitting, trimming, fitting, etc. You also have to cut the radiator cover deal because of the brackets for the HE. I also had to move the tow hook mount I installed last year since it was in the center, and so I just put it to the left. You can see it in the next pic below, just taped on, mocking it up for drilling holes. Sorry no pics of the fascia modding, but it was getting late and needed to get the project done.

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For the hoses from the HE, there are a couple of things. The upper house from the HE goes to the stock HE, and this hose must be under the bumper support. In the pic, I have a clamp on it and the hose is sticking out in front of the front plane of the horizontal bumper support. This won't work as the fascia will sandwich it.

For the lower HE hose which goes to the pump, it's best to trim the plastic on the side, as, again, the hose ends up wedged between the plastic and the fender. This was easy to do, and gives good clearance. I also used a different hose for this one as the radius was pretty tight and the heater hose they sent was a standard one and would flatten slightly, which I didn't want of course. I've been using Vibrant performance heater hose. It's way more flexible and won't flatten out. That worked good. I don't know how the stuff holds up over time, since I don't drive my hot rods a ton, but I used that hose when I installed a Whipple on my 07 mustang and it worked great, just way more flexible. It's the lower hose in the picture below.

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You might notice that I have pushlock AN fittings and I also put hose clamps on them. They are a super tight fight without the hose clamps, but I wanted to be sure it won't leak. Pushlock hose is a specific type of hose that is very tough. I've used it with fuel lines on my Chevelle, and it works great but is a real bear to install. I was using regular heater hoses, so I included the hose clamps too, but I wanted the AN fittings, so I can disconnect it easily if I need to. The kit comes with 1/2" NPT fittings with hose barb ends and clamps.

I've been surprised at how pitifully small the stock HE is and how little coolant is in the stock system. I guess this just shows how efficient the stock intercooler is.

I also installed a BMR reservoir ice tank. I don't plan to put ice in it. I am just trying to increase the total amount of coolant, and the tank has 1.5 gallon capacity. My goal is for my car to be totally stable/consistent with IC temps, so I can know what it will run bracket racing.

Note on BMR tank: I had major issues trying to bleed the IC coolant system. Had to use a vacuum fill tool and modify the lid of the BMR tank, as suggested by fumanchu182. Pics are later down in this thread. You have to get the air out of the system. I recommend strongly you modify the cap so that you can use a vacuum fill tube and either get a second cap or make a plug or something for the modified cap.

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The other option of course is an FI interchiller. According to the company you do need a bigger reservoir to optimize it. The HE route, though, will work great if we ever road race the car, and didn't require any wiring or splicing into other systems.

Over the course of the summer, when racing starts I will post temps. I have a lot of info logged from last year, so I will have good data to compare. If the IC temps can be kept at ambient I will be thrilled. My IAT is always 15-20 degrees higher than my IC coolant temp.

I am sure there are things we could have done differently, and the first time installing something always takes (way) more time. Worked on this and the BMR reservoir off and on for two days and then 13 hours the third day, with a nice lunch break and a couple other short breaks here and there. Nothing too taxing for install, just a lot of time with fitting and trimming, and of course removing and installing about 10 trillion push pins.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I am going to just keep it all in one place. So here goes on the BMR ice tank reservoir

This was an okay install but there are a couple of major things that will help the install dramatically. First, remove the cowl. It only takes 10 minutes, if that. We had to do this when we removed the blower for the plates and pulley, too. Should have done it right away on this project rather than fighting with the hose clamps on the back of the blower with no room.

Second, and this is huge. At least on a 2016, the straight fitting for the outlet side that comes with the tank will not work. The hose has to go from that to the bottom line on the blower. It's just way too tight. We got a 45 degree fitting instead and cut off 1/3 of the hose barb section and then cut out the 90 degree section of a heater hose and used that. I have the dimensions in the pic. Not sure if all hellcats are like this.
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Finally, we ran the hot side hose under the BMR tank, so it's resting on the coil packs pretty much. I used reflective heat tape (good to 2,000 degrees) on the hose where it goes through there. Normally, you wouldn't want to insulate a hose because you want it to cool with the air but since this is under the tank and almost right above the exhaust manifolds, I thought it would be a good idea.I guess we could have run it around the outside of the tank but then it would be over the electrical boxes, and it is very tight in the back between the tank and the firewall.

We also used self adhesive heat shielding on the underside of the tank and on the engine side as well.

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The lines are all AN so it will be "easy" to remove, if I needed to.

As stated above the main idea is just to increase cooling capacity. Don't love that it sits where it does, but not really anywhere else to put something like this since the car has an oil cooler and the stock HE too, and I didn't want to do a trunk mounted ice tank. Gotta keep that sub thumpin', you know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I painted them black before putting the front end and grill back together, so nobody will know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Outstanding… looking forward to the real world results.
Yes, this is an experiment. As many have said regarding these, it isn't going to add power, in terms of max effort/hp. But what I am trying to do is be able to just let the car sit between rounds and then fire it up with the hood closed and go to stage and then just let it idle and have the IC temp stay the same right up until my burnout. Last year, I'd write my dial in on the window and then watch the IC coolant temp and IAT slowly rise, or I'd wait till I was like two cars away from running and then jump out and write my dial in on my window. Sometimes, though, there'd be some issue on the track and then I'd be waiting and watching the temps climb. So, this won't add power but it will hopefully allow me to use that max power most of the time, and be able to know my dial-in much more easily. That is my goal with this.

In the fall when we have good air (4300 DA) is the only time the car is going to run fast anyway. I am just looking for consistency for bracket racing.

Great write up!!
Plan on doing the heat exchanger and blower spacers
Since summer temps here reaches 60’C
The HE adds 60oz of coolant, so that is really good. We will have to compare notes as perhaps we will be able to see what difference the reservoir and extra 1.5 gallons makes. I am running 25% anti-freeze and 75% water and a bottle of water wetter.

Here is a link to a company that has done major research on heat exchangers. It's for mustangs, but the info applies to our cars, too. heat exchangers

I am also going to monitor the temp of the reservoir itself, using an infrared temp gun to see how much heat it's holding, with hood closed, with it open, driving around town, etc.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Great write up!!
Plan on doing the heat exchanger and blower spacers
Since summer temps here reaches 60’C
When I did the blower spacers I used longer locating dowels. There are two dowels on the passenger side that locate the blower so it's square on the motor. With the spacer plates, however, the dowels are not long enough. They can be a little tough to remove. One of them was stuck on the blower side and was a bit of a challenge. Used one of those vise grip slide hammer deals to get it out.

Here is a link to the longer, M8x24mm dowels, that will work with the spacers. Anything to keep it all lined up for the SC belt is a good thing.

M8x24mm dowels for blower spacers

When you do the dowels, that's a good time to swap pulleys too, if you plan on doing that. Of course smaller pulley also equals more heat. . . and so it goes. . .
 

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In all past posts with heat exchangers, people ended up removing them and installing a killer chiller. I am interested to see if you consider this a worthwhile mod. Do you plan on having your tuner run the pump at 100%?
 
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When I did the blower spacers I used longer locating dowels. There are two dowels on the passenger side that locate the blower so it's square on the motor. With the spacer plates, however, the dowels are not long enough. They can be a little tough to remove. One of them was stuck on the blower side and was a bit of a challenge. Used one of those vise grip slide hammer deals to get it out.

Here is a link to the longer, M8x24mm dowels, that will work with the spacers. Anything to keep it all lined up for the SC belt is a good thing.

M8x24mm dowels for blower spacers

When you do the dowels, that's a good time to swap pulleys too, if you plan on doing that. Of course smaller pulley also equals more heat. . . and so it goes. . .
these are for the 10mm spacers, right? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
In all past posts with heat exchangers, people ended up removing them and installing a killer chiller. I am interested to see if you consider this a worthwhile mod. Do you plan on having your tuner run the pump at 100%?
Hey, I will have to check with my tuner on the pump. Yes, I have read the other posts, etc., and I do think that for straight drag racing the interchiller is the best way to go. I have some other considerations as my dad and I both drive this car, and I didn't want him to have to mess with the AC or this or that, or even have to think about anything but getting in the car, firing it up and going for a drive.

I wonder if those who added the HE added a larger reservoir. The amount of coolant in the stock system is pretty minimal. I also wanted to have something that would work well if we get the car on a big track, and I just didn't want to stack another system on. Even though I've done about every performance mod you can do on this car, I do need to keep it comfortable for "daily driving" etc., as, like I said, my Dad cruises it around, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Remember, DO NOT increase capacity or hose length (back to trunk) with a chiller. Defeats the purpose, as the coolant has more time to heat up
I have read the FI interchiller install directions and they do recommend a larger reservoir. Ideally, it would be after the interchiller and then plumbed into the intercooler, etc. They actually have listed what the ideal amount of reservoir capacity is. Can't remember it off the top of my head.

Like you say, you want the shortest route possible from interchiller to reservoir to intercooler. (from what I read in the directions iirc)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Update. I went cruising around town to check IC coolant temps and IATs. The lowest IC coolant temps I had last year racing, even in the Fall when it was 55 degrees, were 95 degrees, with IATs 15-20 degrees higher than that. My highest mph last season was a run with 100/120 for IC temp/IAT, respectively. 104.87 mph at 4360 DA. At 4330 DA and 105/125, the car ran 103.95 mph.

The other day in 55 degree weather, just idling around town at 25 mph and such, the IC coolant temp was 80 degrees and IAT was 100. That is an improvement. My car always dropped off once the IC coolant temp got over 100, so my goal is for it to stay as close to that as possible or below it, and then I will be much better able to predict how it will run for bracket racing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Anyone use Active Interchillers instead of FI? Kit looks more plug and play.
From the AI site:

"For street use, the cabin A/C works in conjunction with the Super Chiller, and there is no reduction in the cabins ability to keep you comfortable. This is a zero maintenance system, once it is installed, you’re finished. You never know its there, other than seeing the super low water temps on the included digital display. On most cars, the Super Chiller adds NO parasitic power loss. Today’s computer controlled systems cut the A/C compressor clutch off as soon as you go to WOT. (Wide open throttle or above a preset rpm cutoff). This has the potential to increase fuel economy, as well as throttle response and HP. When the A/C compressor is on, the supplied Diverter Valve will automatically take the existing heat exchanger out of the loop. This way you get the full performance from the refrigerated water. In turn, when the A/C is off, the existing heat exchanger is used to maintain the IAT’s. We are the first to include this feature, which improves IAT temperatures up to 30% at 95deg ambient. "


That's the way to do it. Also would want more coolant capacity, like the BMR reservoir.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Non of the chillers are "plug and play" really. Whether or not it's a good choice depends on application I would think. If you run, say, mile events, then you'd need a big, like 3 or even 5 gallon reservoir because you drain all that cooling during your run. And obviously for 1/4 mile you wouldn't need that much extra capacity but FI interchillers say you want an additional 1.5 gallons or more, I think. Also, with the stock reservoir and stock coolant capacity, even if the system switches back to using the stock HE at WOT when the AC turns off, now you are heating up the coolant since the ambient air/HE is going to be a lot warmer than the temp of the coolant, so you've lost that, which means in only part of your run are you taking advantage of it, and you are doing the opposite of what would be most helpful since these cars are a beast off the line anyway, and you'd rather have that additional power on the back half of the track.

Also, if your IC temps are 50 degrees, you would need your car tuned to take full advantage of that low IATs, which I guess isn't a big deal.

I do think the chiller with a BMR reservoir would be a good setup for bracket racing if you have more coolant capacity as they suggest, as it would allow you to be absolutely consistent with those coolant and IATs. But I still would rather not add another system that plumbs into the AC and that has additional wiring and switches and such, and for someone who just hits the track occasionally they usually have plenty of cool down time between runs.

I've only read what others have posted about chiller systems and also the install directions for the FI interchiller as well as exchanged some emails with them about setting up the system. The people that run a chiller seem to like them, however, from what I've read and seen.

The above is mostly just bench racing. The chiller guys need to chime in on this one, ha ha
 
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