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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an srt 2015 non hellcat. My cooling fan turns on often in traffic with warmer weather around 225 degrees fan pops on. been the same for years.
Is there anyway to cool it down in n the summer? Should I even worry?
 

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2020 Challenger Hellcat Redeye Wide Body
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It’s doing it’s job. No air hitting the radiator makes the temp rise. Fans cool it down. Until you are moving the cycle will repeat itself. Normal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just makes me a little uneasy every summer, sometimes iam crawling in traffic for one hour! My resovior cracked about a year ago, starting leaking fluid, got hot but never overheated.
 

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The Hellcat probably has an equally loud or louder roar when all fans are running. I noticed it too in 70 degree weather, but extended idling in traffic. I just put the SRT screen on and watched the numbers.
 

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You just have to realize it wasn’t too long ago that a 700hp car had to be trailered everywhere. You are asking a lot sitting in traffic for an hour at a time. Like others have stated the fans will kick on and save the day so it is working as planned but they are going to kick on constantly in those situations.

There used to be a product called water wetter to help in those situations but I haven’t heard of anyone using it in years.
 

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Just keep it in street mode and automatic if u have the A8. Keeping the car in first gear in stop and go traffic heats everything up a lot more than leaving everything in street auto
 

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Just keep it in street mode and automatic if u have the A8. Keeping the car in first gear in stop and go traffic heats everything up a lot more than leaving everything in street auto
If you put the car in ECO it’s great for stop and go in the cat. The car will start in second gear and won’t downshift to first
 

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I have an srt 2015 non hellcat. My cooling fan turns on often in traffic with warmer weather around 225 degrees fan pops on. been the same for years.
Is there anyway to cool it down in n the summer? Should I even worry?
Keep the A/C on.


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If you put the car in ECO it’s great for stop and go in the cat. The car will start in second gear and won’t downshift to first
Now this is a killer idea I’ll have to try this next time I’m stuck in traffic.

Honesty I try to only take the car out in the dead of the night. No one is on the road it’s so sweet. I hate being in a 100,000 dollar 800 horse car in stop and go traffic. Takes a lot of patience and always worried about some fool detailing my car
 

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2020 Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack.
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Just makes me a little uneasy every summer, sometimes iam crawling in traffic for one hour! My resovior cracked about a year ago, starting leaking fluid, got hot but never overheated.
You were lucky. Any leak can result in a loss of pressure in the cooling system and a loss of pressure or just insufficient pressure can have the hot coolant flash to steam. These "pockets" of steam can prevent coolant from contacting the hottest areas of the engine and result in localized overheating. This can result in a failed head gasket or worse.

Always ensure the cooling system is leak free and this includes not only liquid but pressure.
 

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Any leak can result in a loss of pressure in the cooling system and a loss of pressure or just insufficient pressure can have the hot coolant flash to steam.
UNLESS you use pure propylene glycol coolant with no water and no pressure in your cooling system, such as I do.
I used to run around without the caps even on the two reservoirs, but the blower reservoir hugs the hood, so it could slosh a bit on the padding. Now I just place them in there loosely to make sure not to pressure-cycle my system, which is a leading cause of failure in pressurized systems.

Aircraft bodies, for example, are given a certain number of pressure cycles as their lifespan.

If you want to convert painlessly, just take off both your caps and let the water boil off over time, replacing it with pure propylene glycol coolant when the levels drop, such as I did. The pink coolant IS propylene glycol. I didn't do it in hot weather, though, so chances of spot overheating were very minimal. The way I would suggest is short trips around town with no traffic. When you park it, do your shopping, and come back, look at levels in the reservoir. Let it drop quite low before putting in PG, but only add up to the usual fill line so the steam doesn't just push the PG out the overflow. The water will evaporate out over days for most of it, and weeks, for the few straggling molecules. My coolant levels have been stable for quite a few months, now.

No galvanic corrosion no matter how dissimilar and reactive the various engine parts are.

Now my car purrs like a kitten with no water slowly corroding the internals (PG is nonconductive) and no pressure cycling to deteriorate the hoses and resilient bits.

Also, no despised blanket boiling creating a layer of steam over the parts of the engine needing cooling the most, and "protecting" them from being cooled by the liquid coolant. Propylene glycol does not blanket boil, it nucleate boils, so it always has liquid hugging the cooled parts. Less cavitation at the water pump, too, due to its high, high boiling point (370 degrees F.)

Since it cools BETTER, the temp gauge may read hotter, but that is largely because it is just dragging more heat out of the hottest parts of the coolant jacket, such as the combustion chamber domes, that the water-based coolant used to "protect" from cooling by forming a protective blanket of insulating steam on top of them.

I'll never go back to water. Fifth vehicle with PG. One big-block, two small-blocks, an RX7, Neon, and this bambino.
 

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My facts do not have to submit to opinions.

I blew open the radiator on my old Power Wagon by putting a hose from the spigot and kind of sealing it in place in it to flush the system out, when it did not have adequate openings for exit of the water in the system. That was disappointing.

However, being a user of propylene glycol, I rinsed the blown-open seam off thoroughly, used brake cleaner to encourage it to dry off, and used blue RTV silicone and Vice-Grips to shut the seam in the radiator, which was unzipped for about a foot on one side of the rad cap. I let the silicone set up, and took off the Vice-Grips, and drove the truck another few years with the propylene glycol coolant, experiencing no further troubles.

Ignore the closed-minded people who cling blindly to the past. America was not built on that type of person, anyway.

As the less-willfully-ignorant can see, emergency repairs with propylene glycol are a cinch. I also had a radiator hose that had a hole in it. I repaired THAT with electrical tape, and it, too, never leaked again, because it, too, was not under pressure.

Propylene glycol is so completely superior I would never consider going back. Cooling is not only important in overall engine temperature, it is important to reduce the temperature the most where it most needs it: the combustion chamber roofs and upper cylinders. It is especially effective if used in a top-down coolant flow direction, as the Corvette used on one of its model years, introducing the coolest coolant to the hottest part of the engine. With a top-down coolant flow AND propylene glycol's nucleate boiling to take away FAR FAR FAR more heat than an insulating steam blanket of water-ethylene glycol could fantasize to be able to do, it raises the available opportunities for compression and spark advance.
 
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