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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have a 2020 Widebody 392 Challenger which has the Hellcat Redeye double snorkel hood on it. As the hood has the inlet to dump cold air where the cold air filter would be located, I would like to add one.
Question is……. What CAF do people recommend for a 392?
Is the MOPAR CAF a good buy and how does it compare to the likes of the JLT / other manufacturers?
Can you add the Hellcat Rhombi pipe from the Air Catcher Headlamps to it?

Any part numbers would also be much appreciated.

Many thanks in advance.
 

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Hi all,

I have a 2020 Widebody 392 Challenger which has the Hellcat Redeye double snorkel hood on it. As the hood has the inlet to dump cold air where the cold air filter would be located, I would like to add one.
Question is……. What CAF do people recommend for a 392?
Is the MOPAR CAF a good buy and how does it compare to the likes of the JLT / other manufacturers?
Can you add the Hellcat Rhombi pipe from the Air Catcher Headlamps to it?

Any part numbers would also be much appreciated.

Many thanks in advance.
I have an 18 with the single scoop in the middle. I put the Mopar CAI on the car, and was very happy with the fit and Air Intake temp reduction. Part number won't help you much, but the 20 Hellcat setup should work for you.

Good luck, post up pics!

--Jeff
 

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Buy a short piece of appropriately-sized flex duct from Home Depot or an air conditioning store and use the insulated sleeve to slide over your intake as far as you can get it in both directions without becoming entangled in anything.

You can even open it up to go around the bigger air cleaner tub/box/whatever bottom.

Cheap colder air. If you make the ends tidy, it can really look cool, in addition to being cool.

The mylar chrome-looking stuff reflects heat, also, and is tougher than the plain plastic outer shell stuff. If you get some larger stuff, you can slide it quite far onto the throttle body and what have you, as long as you are careful and use zip-ties to keep it out of rotating bits. You may be able to just slide a big flat piece under the blower and see if the engine temps melt the mylar. Maybe better to put the mylar side facing upwards.
 

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2020 Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack.
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My 2020 Scat Pack has the Hellcat hood on it from the factory. Two vents on either side and a scoop in the middle.

Air intake is through a hole next to the head light. Monitoring intake air temperature (IAT) the factory intake system is a very good "CAI" system. IAT can be as low as just 5F over ambient. With cars since 1996 this is the best CAI system bar none.

The twin vents allow hot air from the radiator to escape. The center scoop directs outside air down at the intake and this then continues down and around the engine to force the hot air from the exhaust manifolds down and out the engine compartment.

If you attempt to capture the air from the center scoop for intake air it will be no colder than the air that enters through the hole next to the headlight.

But what you then do is eliminate the benefit the scoop air has in removing heat from the intake system and from the rest of the engine compartment. Absent this flow of cool air from the scoop this could promote hot air from the exhaust being pulled up and heating the engine compartment and intake.

Think you are better off, the car/engine is better off, if you leave the factory intake system alone.
 

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‘16 Challenger w a shaker scoop where the blower should be : )
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Both yer guys hoods are different underneath than what the op has. 20 HC hood scoops are directed to a flat surface underneath that could be sealed (with foam) to act as the airbox lid delivering cold air from above if anyone made the right box for it. Which is exactly what I am trying to do. So far I have not been able to find the right box tho.

You can modify the Mopar cai and make it work (it’s not really designed to seal to the hood even tho it comes with rubber seal on top dumb) but it still has a open bottom which when in the staging lanes etc ends up sucking in hot engine bay air

You have the right hood and the right idea… don’t give up and plz update thx
 

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If you attempt to capture the air from the center scoop for intake air it will be no colder than the air that enters through the hole next to the headlight.
What I like about this hood on the Hellcat is that it blows a steady stream of cold air across the supercharger lid, where THE hottest air is in the intake tract, JUST post-supercharger and before it gets to the aftercoolers.

One reason I like this car is that there are so many little things that are outstanding but can still be detailed to absolutely maximize them if one has the inclination.

There are so many fluids in so may places flowing through so many fittings and hoses. Optimizing those alone is a fun mental exercise. None of the pumps except the oil and air are positive-displacement, which means they only create pressure differentials, which means that any easing of the flow path results in an easier life for the pump and a higher rate of fluid flow.

I know the car is wonderful as it is, but all these fascinating little potential points for tiny improvements are very interesting to a small part of the population, of which I am part.

What the Challenger ALSO has is such a wide range of models and engines and drivetrains one can order, which allows one to order up exactly what one prefers, then, if so inclined, enjoy the process of turning it into exactly what one wants, even if this means going full-honk HHP and going for nines, eight, or whatever, or going for as much as you can wring out of the V6, taking advantage of its lower base weight, then going from there. AWD? 2WD? So many different means to so many different ends.

Sleepers? Over-the-top One-Car-Parades? You name it. Debadged, upbadged, downbadged, sidebadged, it's all there to do with as you please. A trunk-mounted hidden massively sound-muffled twin turbo system? There is plenty of room to hide it under there. I have a new invention that would help sleepers, but I have not patented it. How much stealth do you want? This car has the room to hide almost anything under the generously-proportioned skin.

Imagine a stock-looking Hellcat doing 8's. Imagine a stock-looking AWDmobile pulling 1.2 second 60-foot times. Some things are just fun to play with, mentally, even if they are not done that way in the end.

The only thing this baby doesn't offer yet is a DOHC turbo setup. Look at all that engine bay room. Imagine the fun of an obscene 3.0L inline-4 motor strapped to a giant turbo.

But, as usual, I digress. There is just so much on this car to like. The gasoline engine will not die. It will continue to thrive. It has not even reached half of its potential, yet, whereas the electric motor is almost done, as far as how much efficiency and power you can get out of it. Physics are physics.

This car has just been started, when it comes to various modifications, because it trounces most other cars so well, but over time, those who love every little detail will bring things to bear that keep inching it ever higher, just like the classic muscle cars. When they came out, headers, flat-tappets and gold-plated dual points were cool.

Then came cylinder heads. Then you were allowed to have raised ports in Pro Stock, as-cast, which was a revolution, as they used to have to build up a wedge of stick welding to angle the ports how they liked them, with 25 pounds of aluminum added to make the intake side of the heads higher than the exhaust side, then grind it flat.

Then, this as-cast raised-port configuration spilled into the mainstream with Brodix, the B1, and various other makes, and THEN the Big Three just started redesigning their engines to raise the ports right from the foundry.
Then fuel injection. Then port fuel injection, but those big V8s are still here, as will be the Hellcat and fam. They are not going to die no matter how much the governments of the world declare war on the people on whose behalf they claim to govern.

The future is bright, not only for the careful paint-mark-from-the-assembly-line-preserving collector but the most subtle to most obvious modification lovers.

If I were going to go the full race car route, I'd prefer a model other than the Hellcat or a body-in-white to start with, as I don't like defiling works of art, but, hey, once you buy it, it's your to do with as you wish.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
My 2020 Scat Pack has the Hellcat hood on it from the factory. Two vents on either side and a scoop in the middle.

Air intake is through a hole next to the head light. Monitoring intake air temperature (IAT) the factory intake system is a very good "CAI" system. IAT can be as low as just 5F over ambient. With cars since 1996 this is the best CAI system bar none.

The twin vents allow hot air from the radiator to escape. The center scoop directs outside air down at the intake and this then continues down and around the engine to force the hot air from the exhaust manifolds down and out the engine compartment.

If you attempt to capture the air from the center scoop for intake air it will be no colder than the air that enters through the hole next to the headlight.

But what you then do is eliminate the benefit the scoop air has in removing heat from the intake system and from the rest of the engine compartment. Absent this flow of cool air from the scoop this could promote hot air from the exhaust being pulled up and heating the engine compartment and intake.

Think you are better off, the car/engine is better off, if you leave the factory intake system alone.
@Rockster I don’t have the single scoop though. If you see my original post, I have the double snorkel Redeye hood.
 

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2020 Challenger Hellraisin Scat Pack.
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@Rockster I don’t have the single scoop though. If you see my original post, I have the double snorkel Redeye hood.
Still has the air intake through the hole next to the head light, yeah? That's as cold an air intake as you are going to get even if rig up something to route air from one of the hood openings to the engine. You also have to worry about water ingress from rain, road splash, even washing.
 

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‘16 Challenger w a shaker scoop where the blower should be : )
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What I like about this hood on the Hellcat is that it blows a steady stream of cold air across the supercharger lid…
Great. But he doesn’t have THAT HOOD. Or a SUPERCHARGER lol.


I do not believe you can accurately measure a n/a motors cold air/ram air system on a dyno

It gets hot in a dyno room and whatever speed the air is hitting the front of the car is fixed (by whatever fans are present)

Just cuz this one works better than that one on a dyno doesn’t mean it will on a track

The whole thing is tricky on a n/a motor. Turbulence has hurt power even tho I made more cold air available before
 

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I do not believe you can accurately measure a n/a motors cold air/ram air system on a dyno
What I have been saying for YEARS.

A more accurate way to tell is shut the hood and get some REALLY big, high-velocity fans to blow 100mph fresh, outside air at the car when it's on the dyno.

If I had a N/A Challenger, I'd likely stick a short Mopar Pro scoop on some replacement flat hood , fit a K and N filter to it, that was a good fit, and seal it to the throttle body.

There are FAR better scoops than a Mopar Pro. It was the iconic Mopar drag racing scoop for years.

But there are no cars that can sport one other than Mopars.

To me, it is the most macho hood scoop.

If heat were a concern, I'd insulate the entire intake system down to the ports.

What used to be funny was the Pros trying to start Pro Stocker carbureted engine on hot, humid days to race it, so heat soak is a real thing.

Taking off one's manifold and insulating all available surfaces would yield some results. Insulating the ducting leading to the manifold would help, also.
 

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What I have been saying for YEARS.

A more accurate way to tell is shut the hood and get some REALLY big, high-velocity fans to blow 100mph fresh, outside air at the car when it's on the dyno.

If I had a N/A Challenger, I'd likely stick a short Mopar Pro scoop on some replacement flat hood , fit a K and N filter to it, that was a good fit, and seal it to the throttle body.

There are FAR better scoops than a Mopar Pro. It was the iconic Mopar drag racing scoop for years.

But there are no cars that can sport one other than Mopars.

To me, it is the most macho hood scoop.

If heat were a concern, I'd insulate the entire intake system down to the ports.

What used to be funny was the Pros trying to start Pro Stocker carbureted engine on hot, humid days to race it, so heat soak is a real thing.

Taking off one's manifold and insulating all available surfaces would yield some results. Insulating the ducting leading to the manifold would help, also.
The insulation might help a bit if the intake (and insulation) start out cold but it when the hot engine is shut off or even if operated in a slow speed environment (in town driving) it will eventually heat soak and then the insulation keeps the intake from cooling down as fast as it would otherwise.

The best intake system is one with as little mass as it can have and still withstand the rigors it must endure: Vibration, load, heating and cooling cycles, etc.

This way the intake might get hot quicker when the car is parked with a hot engine but it cools down quicker once the vehicle is underway.

From cold my 2020 Scat Pack intake air temperature stays at 5F above ambient temperature. To me this indicates that Dodge has pretty much produced a very good cold air intake system for this car.

'course, after I come back to the car after parking it with a hot engine the intake temperature is elevated. But once underway and out of stop and go traffic the intake air temperature drops. it won't get down to 5F above ambient but the intake air temperature is not that much above ambient. And there is a benefit to "heated" intake air when the engine is operating in town driving.

If I get on the freeway the intake air temperature will get down to 5F above ambient after a mile or so.

With my Hellcat the intake air temperature was elevated to about 40F above ambient. This was not a fault of the air intake location but due to the air being heated by the supercharger. The liquid cooled charge cooler could really do no better than that. The inter cooler coolant temperature was but 10F above ambient. The inter cooler cooling system was pretty good at shedding heat it picked up from cooling the compressed air. It was just not able to remove any more heat to get the intake temperature down closer to ambient.

To remove more heat from the compressed air the inter cooler would probably have to have been a foot thick.

My experience with at least one other car with factory turbos and air to air charge coolers was once underway the intake air temperature dropped to 10F above ambient. The air to air charge coolers were quite efficient/effective at removing the heat from the compressed air. The actual inter coolers were, each, about the size of a shoe box. Quite large and there was one per cylinder bank of a 3.6l engine.
 

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the insulation keeps the intake from cooling down as fast as it would otherwise.
The intake air is what cools the intake tract as it goes through it. fiberglass wool insulation does not retain a great deal of heat, as it is very light material.

People have been experiencing good results insulating the bottom of their blower and adding metallic heat-reflective film to their intake fresh air system. This has already been proven to work.

If they did what I prescribed, they would experience even greater results, just not necessarily with visual beauty. A layer of insulating blanket that is reflective under the blower, with thick-as-you-can-fit insulation would cool the underside of the blower from being radiantly-heated by the engine.

An adequately heat-resistant film on the outside and a 1-or-two-inch-thick layer of fiberglass wool on the inside for the other parts (not yet compressed air) of the intake tract will insulate the intake tract cool portions better than the thin blankets and films they use so far, but, for the most part, people just buy ready-made solutions, and have little direct experience with real-life thermal management.

To remove more heat from the compressed air the inter cooler would probably have to have been a foot thick.
There HAS been found value in insulating the blower bottom from the engine, and using heat-reflective film on the intake ahead of the throttle body.

But, if more cooling WAS desired in the existing platform, bigger aftercooler rad(s) and bigger aftercooler bricks would help, along with insulating the aftercooler coolant lines and upsizing all conduits and orifices.
 

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The actual inter coolers were, each, about the size of a shoe box. Quite large and there was one per cylinder bank of a 3.6l engine.
Yes, larger aftercoolers would be a desirable thing, indeed. Whipple approaches this with their latest design, as the air passes through the same, flat, aftercooler in the middle on its way up out of the blower rotor area, then back down through the outboard sides of the same big aftercooler on its way down to the port area, cooling the air twice.

If one were to choose a Whipple, and one had the hood clearance, one could just go whole hog and add a second aftercooler on top of the first one if one wanted true cooling supremacy,with appropriate case modifications.
However, an ATAAC (air to air aftercooler) is largely less efficient than an LTAAC (liquid to air aftercooler,) thus some of the increased volume requirement.
 
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