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Yes. But the only way to get one now is with a Jailbreak. If you pick to build the 2022 REWB, it has no exterior options. But I chose the white/red for the classic look. What you couldn't get before this was the copper weave carbon fiber. I think that's the only option in the whole car that couldn't have been gotten on a '21. This is also why I've named the car "Red Pill." I would have saved almost 15 grand had I ordered this car in 2021... but I waited a year too long, so here I am with my dose of reality.
Well, ya only live once. Spending extra $$$ sucks, but with the economy the way it is now, you're paying more for everything anyways.
 
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I for one enjoyed reading what people think will be valuable in the future as they believe they have their finger on the pulse of future collectables based on what was collectable in the past. Market studies should tell you historical trends fail lend themselves to future prospects especially when it comes to cars. There is zero that say the hellcat will be collectable in the future...in fact demographic studies should suggest it wont. There are less interested in muscle cars and the car scene than any point in history. Kids just don't care about cars they why past generations did. When I turned 16 I couldn't get to the DMV fast enough to get my license. Todays youth couldn't give a rip. I know plenty of 20yr olds that don't have their license because it wasn't important to them. Long term prospects for the collectability and worth of these cars depend on there being a sect of society that would want them, and that demographic is slowly fading away.
 

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'21 C8 2LT || Former 2020 Hellcat
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I for one enjoyed reading what people think will be valuable in the future as they believe they have their finger on the pulse of future collectables based on what was collectable in the past. Market studies should tell you historical trends fail lend themselves to future prospects especially when it comes to cars. There is zero that say the hellcat will be collectable in the future...in fact demographic studies should suggest it wont. There are less interested in muscle cars and the car scene than any point in history. Kids just don't care about cars they why past generations did. When I turned 16 I couldn't get to the DMV fast enough to get my license. Todays youth couldn't give a rip. I know plenty of 20yr olds that don't have their license because it wasn't important to them. Long term prospects for the collectability and worth of these cars depend on there being a sect of society that would want them, and that demographic is slowly fading away.
Your logic is flawed. Collectors are a niche demographic. Popular vehicles desired by the masses are typically NEVER collector cars. Vehicles like Mustang GTs, SS Camaros, Subaru WRX, and so on are mainstream vehicles that will have next to no collector value. This is because there are hundreds of thousands of these cars available and everybody wants one and everybody has one to sell. Thus, market competition ensues and the prices on them stay relatively low. I point directly at the "collectible" 65-70 Mustang market. The run-of-the-mill 289, 302 and 351 coupes are a dime a dozen. You can get decent condition ones for under 20 grand. Fastbacks are collectible and fetch a premium. 390, 428, 429 equipped models fetch more again. Then, you have the special edition Mustangs like the Boss and Shelbys (I don't count the Mach 1 as it was a mass produced trim line akin to the modern California Special Edition... see: not rare). Those fetch a massive premium amidst the sea that is the bazillion other Mustangs on the market.

Now, collectors are a small niche market buyer. Most of them employ brokers to locate or find the cars they want at auctions. They are after things that very few, if anyone else has. Rare cars, powerful cars, limited production cars, etc. By default, they don't want a 66 Mustang 289 coupe painted Wimbledon White. In addition, these collectors are -not- the types who don't give a rip about cars. There's plenty of those types, they're called Tesla buyers.

Back in the late 70s and on into the 90s, car culture slipped due to the fact that almost every car made during the dark ages of car manufacturing were poor quality and utterly forgettable. Very few domestic cars made during this time period will wind up as collector items. During that period, people were also less inclined to be gung-ho for cars as they were all homologated to being fuel efficient, low power, low thrill rides. Even the Fox Mustangs and Camaros of the day were under 300hp until the early to mid 90s. They were all just boring, bleh pieces of form molded plastic trimmed junk with bad electronics and the collector market responded thusly. There were still collectors during this period, but they ran more towards things like Porsche and back towards the pre '72 muscle and sports car classics. It was also during this period where you first saw a big run on the '65 Toyota 2000GT (which trades for up over $1 million USD today). The average Joe who loves his 2002 Mustang GT likely has no inkling as to what a '65 2000GT is.

Now, let's look at Challengers/Chargers. Like the Mustangs and Camaros, MOST of them aren't going to be worth big money, pretty much never. The Hellcats are a different issue. Again, these have to be separated to determine their collectability. Base model Houndstooth cloth Hellcats with no options will be worth nothing. Dodge made a lot of these, especially during the '15-'17 model years and many, if not most, wound up as lease vehicles. In general, leased cars are not maintained as well and will have numerous owners during their lives. A car with 5 owners that's 10 years old is something no collector wants. So nix those.

Collectors interested in the Hellcat market are going to look for a few specific things: First - Unmodified. Bone stock. Unmolested. Any Hellcat not in this category will not be collectible. Second - Production year. 2015s and 2023s will be desirable as they're the first/last. The 2015 started it all and the 2023 will be the final evolution with the most improvements. Third - Rarity. Demons go first here. Then, the other rare Hellcats and Redeyes will stack up underneath. Redeyes will always carry a premium over a Hellcat. The rarity of the car will determine interest level. Car guys like a car with a story. Thus, the Jailbreaks will be unique in this group in that they should all be pretty much unique and exclusive unto itself. Further, like the Boss Mustangs, the Jailbreaks will be limited AND be the most powerful non-Demons made. They'll fetch a premium.

The SS will be desirable as it's a relatively low volume max strip performance sub model of the Redeye. Further on the SS, most are likely going to get tracked, if not regularly and many will get modified. Thus, unmolested Super Stocks will become exceedingly rare. Collectors will pay a premium for a low mileage, unmodified Super Stock. Billy Ray down the street will be interested in a ported and cammed SS, but Billy Ray doesn't have $100,000 in disposable cash lying around. Thus, the modified SS's will end up similar to the leased Hellcats in that collectors won't want them and the value will tank as the people who do want them and have the time to chase down mod issues have more limited funds.

For a Hellcat to be collectible, it has to be unmodified, rare, and its production year will amplify the value. There will always be buyers for these cars. 10, 50, 100 years in the future. Kids today might indeed be the buyers of the future, but not all kids are car dumb. There's an awful lot of young people at the racetracks I frequent. Like I did at their age, sometimes they're driving rip-roaring pieces of rolling crap, but they're involved.

In 20 years, if a car person of any caliber hears the word, "Hellcat," trust me, they'll know what it means. 16-22yr olds today who can't afford a Hellcat now will be the big spenders of tomorrow. I fell in love with the Torino when I was a little kid (no idea why). My 2nd car became a 70 Torino 429 Super Cobra Jet. Many of the Hellcats sold in the distant future are going to go to people like me who saw a Hellcat when they were 8 and will be in the position to snag one off the auction block. It doesn't matter so much if an M5 is faster, or a C8 can corner better. The Hellcat has a lasting mystique about it that has been prevelant since day 1. That charm will only increase after they're gone. Trust me.
 

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Your logic is flawed. Collectors are a niche demographic. Popular vehicles desired by the masses are typically NEVER collector cars. Vehicles like Mustang GTs, SS Camaros, Subaru WRX, and so on are mainstream vehicles that will have next to no collector value. This is because there are hundreds of thousands of these cars available and everybody wants one and everybody has one to sell. Thus, market competition ensues and the prices on them stay relatively low. I point directly at the "collectible" 65-70 Mustang market. The run-of-the-mill 289, 302 and 351 coupes are a dime a dozen. You can get decent condition ones for under 20 grand. Fastbacks are collectible and fetch a premium. 390, 428, 429 equipped models fetch more again. Then, you have the special edition Mustangs like the Boss and Shelbys (I don't count the Mach 1 as it was a mass produced trim line akin to the modern California Special Edition... see: not rare). Those fetch a massive premium amidst the sea that is the bazillion other Mustangs on the market.

Now, collectors are a small niche market buyer. Most of them employ brokers to locate or find the cars they want at auctions. They are after things that very few, if anyone else has. Rare cars, powerful cars, limited production cars, etc. By default, they don't want a 66 Mustang 289 coupe painted Wimbledon White. In addition, these collectors are -not- the types who don't give a rip about cars. There's plenty of those types, they're called Tesla buyers.

Back in the late 70s and on into the 90s, car culture slipped due to the fact that almost every car made during the dark ages of car manufacturing were poor quality and utterly forgettable. Very few domestic cars made during this time period will wind up as collector items. During that period, people were also less inclined to be gung-ho for cars as they were all homologated to being fuel efficient, low power, low thrill rides. Even the Fox Mustangs and Camaros of the day were under 300hp until the early to mid 90s. They were all just boring, bleh pieces of form molded plastic trimmed junk with bad electronics and the collector market responded thusly. There were still collectors during this period, but they ran more towards things like Porsche and back towards the pre '72 muscle and sports car classics. It was also during this period where you first saw a big run on the '65 Toyota 2000GT (which trades for up over $1 million USD today). The average Joe who loves his 2002 Mustang GT likely has no inkling as to what a '65 2000GT is.

Now, let's look at Challengers/Chargers. Like the Mustangs and Camaros, MOST of them aren't going to be worth big money, pretty much never. The Hellcats are a different issue. Again, these have to be separated to determine their collectability. Base model Houndstooth cloth Hellcats with no options will be worth nothing. Dodge made a lot of these, especially during the '15-'17 model years and many, if not most, wound up as lease vehicles. In general, leased cars are not maintained as well and will have numerous owners during their lives. A car with 5 owners that's 10 years old is something no collector wants. So nix those.

Collectors interested in the Hellcat market are going to look for a few specific things: First - Unmodified. Bone stock. Unmolested. Any Hellcat not in this category will not be collectible. Second - Production year. 2015s and 2023s will be desirable as they're the first/last. The 2015 started it all and the 2023 will be the final evolution with the most improvements. Third - Rarity. Demons go first here. Then, the other rare Hellcats and Redeyes will stack up underneath. Redeyes will always carry a premium over a Hellcat. The rarity of the car will determine interest level. Car guys like a car with a story. Thus, the Jailbreaks will be unique in this group in that they should all be pretty much unique and exclusive unto itself. Further, like the Boss Mustangs, the Jailbreaks will be limited AND be the most powerful non-Demons made. They'll fetch a premium.

The SS will be desirable as it's a relatively low volume max strip performance sub model of the Redeye. Further on the SS, most are likely going to get tracked, if not regularly and many will get modified. Thus, unmolested Super Stocks will become exceedingly rare. Collectors will pay a premium for a low mileage, unmodified Super Stock. Billy Ray down the street will be interested in a ported and cammed SS, but Billy Ray doesn't have $100,000 in disposable cash lying around. Thus, the modified SS's will end up similar to the leased Hellcats in that collectors won't want them and the value will tank as the people who do want them and have the time to chase down mod issues have more limited funds.

For a Hellcat to be collectible, it has to be unmodified, rare, and its production year will amplify the value. There will always be buyers for these cars. 10, 50, 100 years in the future. Kids today might indeed be the buyers of the future, but not all kids are car dumb. There's an awful lot of young people at the racetracks I frequent. Like I did at their age, sometimes they're driving rip-roaring pieces of rolling crap, but they're involved.

In 20 years, if a car person of any caliber hears the word, "Hellcat," trust me, they'll know what it means. 16-22yr olds today who can't afford a Hellcat now will be the big spenders of tomorrow. I fell in love with the Torino when I was a little kid (no idea why). My 2nd car became a 70 Torino 429 Super Cobra Jet. Many of the Hellcats sold in the distant future are going to go to people like me who saw a Hellcat when they were 8 and will be in the position to snag one off the auction block. It doesn't matter so much if an M5 is faster, or a C8 can corner better. The Hellcat has a lasting mystique about it that has been prevelant since day 1. That charm will only increase after they're gone. Trust me.
Yes, a nice breakdown of the pecking order of what might be collectable years from now. But you said it - to a niche audience. I'm 63 and watch the car auctions on TV if I am bored. Invariably, the buyers are normally my age or older. Do older folks have more accumulated wealth? Yes they do. Are there young folks with significant wealth as well? Of course. I don't see them interested in classic cars as a general rule. No young people in any of the classic car clubs in my city. So who are the future buyers of all these classic cars? Don't know - my 17 YO daughter and her circle of male and female friends couldn't jump start a car if you put 20 of them together. Zero interest in cars. Yes, I did see a few younger enthusiasts at the drag strip (oops our 1/4 strip just closed - that was Atlanta International Dragway - tracks are closing, not opening - better use of the land for other development). IMO TM is correct - it is a dying hobby from every metric that I have read or have observed. Things might change, who knows. Regardless, certain cars will be more desirable than others and your points are all good ones.
 

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Yes, a nice breakdown of the pecking order of what might be collectable years from now. But you said it - to a niche audience. I'm 63 and watch the car auctions on TV if I am bored. Invariably, the buyers are normally my age or older. Do older folks have more accumulated wealth? Yes they do. Are there young folks with significant wealth as well? Of course. I don't see them interested in classic cars as a general rule. No young people in any of the classic car clubs in my city. So who are the future buyers of all these classic cars? Don't know - my 17 YO daughter and her circle of male and female friends couldn't jump start a car if you put 20 of them together. Zero interest in cars. Yes, I did see a few younger enthusiasts at the drag strip (oops our 1/4 strip just closed - that was Atlanta International Dragway - tracks are closing, not opening - better use of the land for other development). IMO TM is correct - it is a dying hobby from every metric that I have read or have observed. Things might change, who knows. Regardless, certain cars will be more desirable than others and your points are all good ones.
Yes Merica has killed young testosterone so Priuses will have higher resale value.


J/k kind of
:)
 

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You might not be far off...look at the rise of the tuner market. 30yrs ago, who could have guessed that one?
Well, a rise from nothing to a level of lukewarm isn't anything to write home about. Now, if you want to see something funny... The Honda S2000... one of the most tuned cars on the planet. If it's been modified, they aren't worth 10 grand on most markets. I don't care how professional the job is... if it's modified, nobody wants them from a collectable standpoint. Now, a bone stock, low mileage S2000? SIXTY GRAND.

I've personally seen 3 sell at auction. One above 60 and 2 above 50. All three had under 15k miles and were bone stock. Cars like these, Supras (with the 2JZ mill), Mitsubishi 3000GT (Dodge Stealth) and even Mitsubishi Eclipse Turbo (or Eagle Talon TSi) cars, left alone and unmolested, are doing very well on the collector market. I recently saw a 91 Eagle Talon TSI with 18k miles sell for $44,000.

The -only- reason these supremely popular tuner cars sell for big money (relative to their perceived value) is because they're NOT tuned. The Supras can sell for 6 figures if in similar unmolested perfect condition. That's always going to be the key with tuner cars though... heh, as in not tuned, tuner cars. The instant someone gets their hands in one, they're worthless.

A friend of mine I was in the USAF with bought an R33 Skyline while in Japan (right hand drive) and imported it in Feb 2021. He paid around $40,000 for it and the military shipped it to the US for free as part of his PCS move. He got it here, modified it with a larger turbo and did some engine work to it. Life happened and he decided to sell it. Best offer he got was $37,000. Had he just left the thing alone (as I begged him to), he could have gotten over 100k in the US market for that car. His would have been one of, if not the very first legal R33s in the country. His only had 9,000km on the odometer. But no, he had to go and tune it and he ended up selling it to Carvana for under 40k.
 

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Yes Merica has killed young testosterone so Priuses will have higher resale value.


J/k kind of
:)
Heh, maybe. But if any electric vehicle holds value, it's going to be as folk art or a lawn ornament because nobody is going to pay money to replace those batteries. That's one group of car that will likely never be collectable. Who knows, maybe a 1st Gen Tesla Model S will be worth 200 grand one day and it'll make economic sense to keep dropping $25,000 batteries into them every time they need one. But, I think there's a higher chance that the cars will be donated to Jerry's Kids just to get the tax write-off.
 

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:mad::mad::mad:
2021 rewb ordered on 9/30 was canceled on 12/22, on waiting list for jailbreak , emailed tim K. the ceo of fca to see what we can do to make things right, considerable cost increase, first dodge purchase , always a chevy man
 

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Tim K: Sees email with subject line: "I ordered a car I didnt't rece...."
Tim K: Presses Delete

Sad, but more than likely true. Unfortunately, yours likely got caught in the backlog awaiting chips, then ran out of time for production before the 2022s started. Dodge isn't giving price breaks to anybody... and this is my 4th. Did I get any sort of special treatment? Nope, other than they gladly took my money for the 4th time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Wow, have I missed out on a bunch of replies. Seems like we have all moved into value in the future and electric vehicles. Value is only relative to what someone is going to pay for it, or what your feeling is for it, ie emotion. Year may matter, but honestly when you look at the fact that the JB will be the most HP (other than the Demon) Challenger in the largest production engine, that we will probably never see again in any production vehicle, I think the odds of are in the favor of the JB, no matter the year, of having great value. Yes, going from a REWB that I currently have to a JB seems a little stupid, but like someone said, I will try to take advantage of the fact that the used car market is red hot, especially for these vehicles. Plus, this will be mine all mine because I built it exactly the way I want it. My REWB was bought off the dealer lot, with the majority of the features I wanted, and I learned a lot more about what I really wanted in this car, which no matter what will be the end of an era. To put into perspective, the JB has more HP than any car including the GT500 and that trick Ferrari. Both companies, including every other company out there that makes high performance cars is moving away from all petrol, to some sort of electric or hybrid electric. Yes you may find a 900HP vehicle in the future, but trust me, it will be electric. As my daddy always taught me: If you can’t hear it, you can’t fear it. And God damn does that HEMI in any form sound Awesome.
 

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I guess I just don’t get it, sorry. I cringe a bit every time I read a post where someone is happy to get the opportunity to pay only MSRP plus doc fees. A year ago, anyone making such a post would have been laughed off the forum.

I have never been a WB fan which seems to turn out to be very fortunate.

I’m too old to be thinking about future value, I am looking just to drive and enjoy. No real racing, maybe a couple trips to the strip for fun, and Land Speed Trials once or twice/year. The WB does not offer anything over the NB for my purposes, other than weight and drag. Ya ya, they are different animals, and it seems like most guys want the other, it’s great we have these choices offered to us so we should all be happy.

The RENB suits me perfectly, and I was able to order the exact config I want, no upcharge, and at Koons discount pricing. Hope to see it this spring, I’m hoping late April. I hope ya’ll get the car you want and are just as happy! It’s good to be happy! :)
 

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I guess I just don’t get it, sorry. I cringe a bit every time I read a post where someone is happy to get the opportunity to pay only MSRP plus doc fees. A year ago, anyone making such a post would have been laughed off the forum.

I have never been a WB fan which seems to turn out to be very fortunate.

I’m too old to be thinking about future value, I am looking just to drive and enjoy. No real racing, maybe a couple trips to the strip for fun, and Land Speed Trials once or twice/year. The WB does not offer anything over the NB for my purposes, other than weight and drag. Ya ya, they are different animals, and it seems like most guys want the other, it’s great we have these choices offered to us so we should all be happy.

The RENB suits me perfectly, and I was able to order the exact config I want, no upcharge, and at Koons discount pricing. Hope to see it this spring, I’m hoping late April. I hope ya’ll get the car you want and are just as happy! It’s good to be happy! :)
when did you order at koons
 

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I guess I just don’t get it, sorry. I cringe a bit every time I read a post where someone is happy to get the opportunity to pay only MSRP plus doc fees. A year ago, anyone making such a post would have been laughed off the forum.

I have never been a WB fan which seems to turn out to be very fortunate.

I’m too old to be thinking about future value, I am looking just to drive and enjoy. No real racing, maybe a couple trips to the strip for fun, and Land Speed Trials once or twice/year. The WB does not offer anything over the NB for my purposes, other than weight and drag. Ya ya, they are different animals, and it seems like most guys want the other, it’s great we have these choices offered to us so we should all be happy.

The RENB suits me perfectly, and I was able to order the exact config I want, no upcharge, and at Koons discount pricing. Hope to see it this spring, I’m hoping late April. I hope ya’ll get the car you want and are just as happy! It’s good to be happy! :)
Yes, well, I didn't really care for the Challenger WB when I first saw it. I'm OK with it now. I do happen to prefer it on the Charger so that's what I ordered. I have a Scat Challenger NB with the Dynamics package and the 275 tires currently. Obviously with 800 HP on a NBRE that tire gets overwhelmed pretty quickly. To my untrained eye, the 275 looks really small. My ZL1 has 315's. If they engineered the Challenger to mount a 315 on the back without the stick on flares and have it tucked that would be great. Of course you can get a 275 to hook with enough sidewall by changing the wheel size and going with a DR. And in stock configuration I would assume that you have the fastest top speed of any other model. Correct? The last test I saw on a NB Hellcat Charger (only 717 hp) had it at 203 MPH. So you have the NB Challenger with another 80 HP. Skip the unsprung weight on the bigger wheels and tires, skip the wind drag on the flares, skip the weight on all these items. I think I read that the top speed on a HCREWB Charger was still going to be 203 MPH. Wonder how much faster your car will be without all the drag and weight? If anyone knows I would like to hear it. I know I won't ever crack 150 but it's nice to know. One man's meat is another man's poison.
 

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Your logic is flawed.

if that statement would be true then people wouldn't be investing into a math problem i.e. bitcoin. even with that being said, nothing in the world is guaranteed to be collectable in the future...including gold. some prospects are better than others...cars on the other hand are historically low on that scale and they are sinking, not growing
 

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:mad::mad::mad:
2021 rewb ordered on 9/30 was canceled on 12/22, on waiting list for jailbreak , emailed tim K. the ceo of fca to see what we can do to make things right, considerable cost increase, first dodge purchase , always a chevy man
My advice to you is to park yourself in front of your computer, open your email program or website and continually refresh or check for new mail until you get a response.
 

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2022 Charger SRT Jailbreak
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I guess I just don’t get it, sorry. I cringe a bit every time I read a post where someone is happy to get the opportunity to pay only MSRP plus doc fees. A year ago, anyone making such a post would have been laughed off the forum.
You do realize the car market has changed quite a bit since last year.
 

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Yes, well, I didn't really care for the Challenger WB when I first saw it. I'm OK with it now. I do happen to prefer it on the Charger so that's what I ordered. I have a Scat Challenger NB with the Dynamics package and the 275 tires currently. Obviously with 800 HP on a NBRE that tire gets overwhelmed pretty quickly. To my untrained eye, the 275 looks really small. My ZL1 has 315's. If they engineered the Challenger to mount a 315 on the back without the stick on flares and have it tucked that would be great. Of course you can get a 275 to hook with enough sidewall by changing the wheel size and going with a DR. And in stock configuration I would assume that you have the fastest top speed of any other model. Correct? The last test I saw on a NB Hellcat Charger (only 717 hp) had it at 203 MPH. So you have the NB Challenger with another 80 HP. Skip the unsprung weight on the bigger wheels and tires, skip the wind drag on the flares, skip the weight on all these items. I think I read that the top speed on a HCREWB Charger was still going to be 203 MPH. Wonder how much faster your car will be without all the drag and weight? If anyone knows I would like to hear it. I know I won't ever crack 150 but it's nice to know. One man's meat is another man's poison.
Who cares the WB goes a couple of MPH less on the top speed. No one drives them that fast. I think it's more about quickness than top speed. They are both wonderful cars.
 
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