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2022 Hellraisen SS
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How much gas should I run with a stock SS at the track? And should I leave traction control on? I was wondering what would happen if I left it in traction control and did launch control at 1000 RPMs what would be the outcome. Let me know what you think it will do and I’ll try it at the track when I go.
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Challenger SRT Hellcat
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Half a tank. Sport mode. Def leave some sort TC on, if you get squirrely itll save your ass.
 

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Track mode is too stiff, unless hes autocrossing. Street suspension for better weight transference.
 

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Is the traction control different on a super stock than on a regular hellcat? I ask because I've accidentally left my traction control on and it's awful running down the track like that, felt like the motor was cutting out, and I was like what the heck just happened. It's so completely different than running it without that it seems like it's not worth doing.

Is there some type of stability control that he should still have on?

Or is the super stock different as far as the traction control goes? Please school me, SS owners.
 
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'21 C8 2LT || Former 2020 Hellcat
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FYI. The reason you go for 1/2 tank is because during race conditions, you can easily slosh the gas back away from the fuel pumps during launch if the tank is too low. I never had this issue with my Hellcat, because I always ran it with a near full tank (more traction :) ). However, in my 2015 Mustang drag car I owned, I did suck air into the fuel pumps once and it crapped out a few of my injectors. Lesson learned.
 

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Op, race the car near 1/4 of a tank for the little bit weight savings and yes leave TC on. I don't think you would want to chance wrecking a beautiful SS if anything. Sure anything can happen but having TC on will ensure peace of mind.

When I race my custom setup is....

Track - Transmission
Street - Suspension
Sport - Traction

I've raced with the TC off and I don't think it made any difference so might as well have some sort of TC on to play it safe. You could still always try it with the TC off and see but get comfortable knowing the car first before making that move.

You can try those settings I use and try leaving at 1k rpms like you mentioned. It's all trial and error as I've done many 1/4 mile passes and have found what's worked for me.

If 1k rpms hooks well off the line cool, maybe stick with it or even play around a little and bump up the rpms just a tad on each run and see how the car responds.

Honestly the experiment and Challenge of it makes it quite fun and interesting. Eventually you'll find the sweet spot. 😉
 

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once again he has a super stock... suspension in Track !!!

There is still traction control when in track mode..


Just put it in track.

Wouldn't street suspension be better for transferring the weight?

But again it's a Super Stock so maybe it's different as opposed to a regular Cat.

You have an SS so I'm sure you would know better.
 

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FYI. The reason you go for 1/2 tank is because during race conditions, you can easily slosh the gas back away from the fuel pumps during launch if the tank is too low. I never had this issue with my Hellcat, because I always ran it with a near full tank (more traction :) ). However, in my 2015 Mustang drag car I owned, I did suck air into the fuel pumps once and it crapped out a few of my injectors. Lesson learned.
Well, it's really you don't want to go too much under a half a tank. And I will tell you that was not known or ever posted on here until it happened to me back in 2015. I was testing the 1st Diablo Tune and that happened and that experience almost made me cry! I thought it was the Tune but it was the tank was too low. I always keep my Tank around the 1/2 full. Maybe 2 runs after but that's it.
 

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My understanding of the track setting in the SS is that it is designed specifically for drag racing. The rear suspension is softer and front stiffer on launch in track mode unlike a typical HC track setting
 

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Wouldn't street suspension be better for transferring the weight?

But again it's a Super Stock so maybe it's different as opposed to a regular Cat.

You have an SS so I'm sure you would know better.
Track in a super stock is kind of like a 20/80 up front and a stiff shock in the rear specifically for weight transfer under full throttle.
 

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My understanding of the track setting in the SS is that it is designed specifically for drag racing. The rear suspension is softer and front stiffer on launch in track mode unlike a typical HC track setting
Hey purrkitty. That sounds backwards to me, at least for how most drag cars would be set up. For drag racing, you want it stiff in the back. This is newton's 3rd law. If the suspension is "collapsing" that means that the tire is being pulled away from the ground. If the distance between the body and the suspension stays the same or increases, that means the force on the tire is going the opposite direction, which means it's planting the tire. Good "squat" is the tire biting down into the track and wrinkling up. I read online people talking about squat like it is a good thing. I guess that's what they mean, the tire smooshing which makes it look like the body is going down. But I am old enough that sometimes the words people use have changed, lol. It's always confusing to me to read that.

In the "old" days (the 80's ha ha), we talked about anti-squat bars, etc., which were used to keep the body from squatting, or we would run air bags, or a stiffer spring and lakewood drag shocks, or an adjustable shock, or lowering brackets for the lower control arms. Anti squat bars, like on my chevelle, shorten the instant center. Nowadays on 3 link or 4 link solid axle street cars everyone uses lowering brackets for the rear mounting point of the lower control arms to achieve the same effect rather than raising the diff mounting point of the upper arms. IRS is a whole different game, of which I don't know much.

Watch a street car at the track, especially if it's a stick, and if they have stock suspension you'll see the back end squat down ever time they shift, and they are probably also losing traction momentarily.

In the front, run loose. Adjustable shock. My mustang I set the front shock on 3 and the rear on 8 (12 being the stiffest setting).

I haven't found that unbolting the front sway bar matters if you still have the same spring and shock. But I haven't checked this on my hellcat, just other cars like my Chevelle and mustang. Front springs have to have stored energy so there is front end travel and an adjustable shock. Measure from the edge of the fender, right above the tire to the ground, and then start jacking up that side until the tire is almost off the ground. Measure down from the fender again. That difference is your front end travel. I had like 8 or 9" of travel on my Chevelle. Great for drag racing. Terrible for street driving. But it's easy to check just do what I described here and see if the front end travel changes when you disconnect the endlinks. Getting the weight off is another matter, so if someone were trying to save every pound it would make sense.

These modern cars are pretty amazing with how they can hook up without having the suspensions set up for drag racing. Today's race tires are probably a part of that too. A good track and really good tires make up for a lot of the poor setup in suspension, I guess. And, again, this modern IRS and all that is pretty darn cool.

To really see how much the car squats in terms of the body relationship to the suspension, put a zip tie on the shock and make a pass. Then look and see how far the zip tie moved up.

The one thing I wish the hellcats had is an adjustable rear shock.

Pretty cool that the SS has a setting like that for drag racing.

Front drag shocks usually come in 90/10, 80/20, or 60/40. The first number is how easily it will extend and the second is how easily it will compress. The idea is for it to extend quickly and then stay there and slowly come back down, etc. So a 90/10 shock basically extends 9 times more easily than it compresses. For rear shocks it might be 50/50 or whatever. I have single adj on my mustang so it changes both extension and compression together. A double adjustable shock you can control the compression and extension separately. I've never had a car that was fast enough to need double adjustable, lol, but my friend has a chevelle that runs 6.40s in the 1/8 lifting to stay legal, at 5500 DA and he really has that thing dialed in, all motor. The shocks are $$$.

I also haven't found that an adjust front shock matters much if you are still using the stock front spring since the spring rate isn't designed for stored energy to allow the front end to travel.

Dang I wrote a lot. Sorry about that everyone.
 

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Hey purrkitty. That sounds backwards to me, at least for how most drag cars would be set up. For drag racing, you want it stiff in the back. This is newton's 3rd law. If the suspension is "collapsing" that means that the tire is being pulled away from the ground. If the distance between the body and the suspension stays the same or increases, that means the force on the tire is going the opposite direction, which means it's planting the tire. Good "squat" is the tire biting down into the track and wrinkling up. I read online people talking about squat like it is a good thing. I guess that's what they mean, the tire smooshing which makes it look like the body is going down. But I am old enough that sometimes the words people use have changed, lol. It's always confusing to me to read that.

In the "old" days (the 80's ha ha), we talked about anti-squat bars, etc., which were used to keep the body from squatting, or we would run air bags, or a stiffer spring and lakewood drag shocks, or an adjustable shock, or lowering brackets for the lower control arms. Anti squat bars, like on my chevelle, shorten the instant center. Nowadays on 3 link or 4 link solid axle street cars everyone uses lowering brackets for the rear mounting point of the lower control arms to achieve the same effect rather than raising the diff mounting point of the upper arms. IRS is a whole different game, of which I don't know much.

Watch a street car at the track, especially if it's a stick, and if they have stock suspension you'll see the back end squat down ever time they shift, and they are probably also losing traction momentarily.

In the front, run loose. Adjustable shock. My mustang I set the front shock on 3 and the rear on 8 (12 being the stiffest setting).

I haven't found that unbolting the front sway bar matters if you still have the same spring and shock. But I haven't checked this on my hellcat, just other cars like my Chevelle and mustang. Front springs have to have stored energy so there is front end travel and an adjustable shock. Measure from the edge of the fender, right above the tire to the ground, and then start jacking up that side until the tire is almost off the ground. Measure down from the fender again. That difference is your front end travel. I had like 8 or 9" of travel on my Chevelle. Great for drag racing. Terrible for street driving. But it's easy to check just do what I described here and see if the front end travel changes when you disconnect the endlinks. Getting the weight off is another matter, so if someone were trying to save every pound it would make sense.

These modern cars are pretty amazing with how they can hook up without having the suspensions set up for drag racing. Today's race tires are probably a part of that too. A good track and really good tires make up for a lot of the poor setup in suspension, I guess. And, again, this modern IRS and all that is pretty darn cool.

To really see how much the car squats in terms of the body relationship to the suspension, put a zip tie on the shock and make a pass. Then look and see how far the zip tie moved up.

The one thing I wish the hellcats had is an adjustable rear shock.

Pretty cool that the SS has a setting like that for drag racing.

Front drag shocks usually come in 90/10, 80/20, or 60/40. The first number is how easily it will extend and the second is how easily it will compress. The idea is for it to extend quickly and then stay there and slowly come back down, etc. So a 90/10 shock basically extends 9 times more easily than it compresses. For rear shocks it might be 50/50 or whatever. I have single adj on my mustang so it changes both extension and compression together. A double adjustable shock you can control the compression and extension separately. I've never had a car that was fast enough to need double adjustable, lol, but my friend has a chevelle that runs 6.40s in the 1/8 lifting to stay legal, at 5500 DA and he really has that thing dialed in, all motor. The shocks are $$$.

I also haven't found that an adjust front shock matters much if you are still using the stock front spring since the spring rate isn't designed for stored energy to allow the front end to travel.

Dang I wrote a lot. Sorry about that everyone.
What I understand is the rebound is slower in the rear end so when the car squats it bites and the front is stiffer to keep the pressure transferred to the back. I guess softer isn’t the correct term. My point was that the SS in track setting is for a drag “track”, not a road course like the standard HC. I believe tre traction control on track is different between the models as well. In Track TC on the HC is intended to prevent side to side where the sport TC is more for straight line. The SS, as someone said earlier in this thread, is designed to run on track mode at the drag strip for tranny, TC and suspension.
that is where I would start in testing a new car on the strip. I am no expert though, just a car nerd that Is co side ring a JB or a SS so have done some research lately on the differences
 
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