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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My powertrain warranty is up in May 2021. The idea of not having a powertrain warranty with a car that has a $20k motor is daunting to me, as I am still financing the car until 2023.

From those that have experience with engine failure for whatever reason what were your options/costs out of warranty?

Not much info on what people do after engine failures out there. Do people typically rebuild their current motor or buy a new crate motor?

The following shows an example with a 3 year unlimited warranty, (can this be used for a hellcat or is this strictly for classic cars or restomods?):


OR is it a lot less costly to just pay someone reputable to rebuild the motor. I don't do any work myself (I'm not "mechanical" at all). How much $$ for a typical rebuilt motor??

My car runs perfectly currently and I maybe overthinking this but I love the car and am just trying to plan ahead.
The good thing is hellcat engine failures don't seem to be common at all, especially the stock ones.
 

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rebuild cost depends on alot
who is r&r the engine
what part of the country you live in
what's broken
can the owner do his own work
how many stock engines have failed?

my friend just bought a NEW hellcat engine complete for 14000 for his 300 mile jeep that broke the supercharger
from Over spinning the blower
turns out the long block was just fine and he sold it for 5000
you can buy a short block also or a long block from mopar
don't seem like OP beats or has modded his car
 

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Discussion Starter #6
rebuild cost depends on alot
who is r&r the engine
what part of the country you live in
what's broken
can the owner do his own work
how many stock engines have failed?

my friend just bought a NEW hellcat engine complete for 14000 for his 300 mile jeep that broke the supercharger
from Over spinning the blower
turns out the long block was just fine and he sold it for 5000
you can buy a short block also or a long block from mopar
don't seem like OP beats or has modded his car
I definitely don't abuse or race my car. I do enjoy regular spirited driving though. Not interested in modding other than maybe drag radials for better traction from a roll.
I do like the idea of potentially salvaging the block etc.
I'd realistically be more interested in a new complete engine, as I don't work on cars myself (at all) and don't trust speed shops much..I'm sure rebuild costs can get convoluted.
I guess I'd get more of a warm and fuzzy if I knew it came with a 3 year warranty though. Could anyone clarify?
 

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That question honestly has many answers. Depends on what the failure is. Supercharger, upper or lower internals will all have degrees of severity and different costs. New crate is just under $15k. rebuild would be less I am guessing, again, depending on a number of factors.

Overall these motors are on the better end of the reliability spectrum and I would not concern yourself with any major issues. Don't modify the car, do the scheduled maintenance, use the right parts and fluids and you will be fine. It is not the the Mustang GT350 and the multitude of issues with the Voodoo motor. SRT did a wonderful job on our cats powerplant. I wish they had beefed up the driveline a bit more but I understand the need to keep costs down. Our cars could have had wider rear tires too. Overall, if you don't race it or mod it you're fine. I bought an 8 year 60000 warranty for $2,200 for my 2015 with 175 miles on it. It was well worth it because I have already had to take it in for a problem with the active dampening system. I really got it for the supercharger if it goes on me as I know some had issues with the first gen superchargers.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks.I figured they seem to be pretty reliable and I definitely properly maintain the car.
I bought mine as a CPO with only 3100 miles but just found out CPO doesn't exist for these car and only have whats left of the powertrain warranty. The car dealer false advertised and lied about the CPO! Even when negotiating the price they were factoring the their cost to get the car certified... Still low miles at 13k but past the 3 year mark so I cant get an extended factory warranty at this point and why I'm asking (in the event of a catastrophic motor failure) if a new crate hellcat motor will at least come with a 3 year warranty?

As far as the superchargers, at lease one person on these forums posted a low cost/feasible option for new supercharger with a core or rebuild, something along those lines.
 

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As already said, it all depends on how yours failed and if its salvageable. So long as you haven't windowed the block or took a chunk out of a cylinder it can most likely be rebuilt or a good core towards a rebuilt short block. I'd be tempted myself to just spend the extra cash for a forged 426 stroker short block. May as well take the extra cubes while its apart. These are fairly stout engines though...I can see a blower failing before the lower end, which seems more common.
 

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I wouldn't worry about it unless your modifying the engine, pulley swaps, etc.
I would pin the crank when the 5yr/60,000 powertrain expires if your worried.
Or pin it now if you plan on keeping it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I wouldn't worry about it unless your modifying the engine, pulley swaps, etc.
I would pin the crank when the 5yr/60,000 powertrain expires if your worried.
Or pin it now if you plan on keeping it.
To clarify, I'm not really worried, as I have faith this powertrain is pretty reliable.
I guess what I'm really after is the amount of money I should generally put aside for a catastrophic failure out of warranty.
If I never use that money, it can of course be a nice down payment for the latest and greatest I can afford in the future as well ;)
 

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Ii wouldn't worry unless you plan ahead for engine failure on every car you own. I think they are very reliable when left stock.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Ii wouldn't worry unless you plan ahead for engine failure on every car you own. I think they are very reliable when left stock.
I typically don't keep my performance cars past their powertrain warranty. Normal car I wouldn't care but the Hellcat motor cost a lot more than the average car. I may also consider modding down the road and want to see what I should generally put aside in case of a failure for piece of mind. $15k, $20k??
People that mod don't plan for this?

As I said in my original post, I thought I bought a CPO car and was covered 7/100k but the dealer lied and I won't be covered past 5/21.
I could jump ship and trade up to a lightly used redeye. Just trying to weight my options and whether or not keeping my current HC is overall worth it.
 

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To clarify, I'm not really worried, as I have faith this powertrain is pretty reliable.
I guess what I'm really after is the amount of money I should generally put aside for a catastrophic failure out of warranty.
If I never use that money, it can of course be a nice down payment for the latest and greatest I can afford in the future as well ;)
Set aside the cost of a replacement engine.

An engine needing a rebuild in under 100K+ miles is rare. Actually in my experience an engine needing a rebuild at any time is rare. I've driven a number of cars to 150K miles and beyond and the engines were fine.

However, I rebuilt two engines. One because I wanted to for the experience and the other because after I bought the vehicle I found the cam bearings were gone. Nothing catastrophic just the results from an engine spending way too much time idling with the resulting low amount of oil flow the cam bearings.

If the engine suffers some mechanical failure I was told it is generally not advisable to use that as a rebuild starting place. An engine that suffers from lack of oil or from overheating are other examples of engines that are best not rebuilt.

When I was in the engine rebuilding mode I had access to a very good auto engine machine shop. My auto tech buddies used it and recommended it and it proved to be a good shop. Nothing fancy though just hot tanking and magnafluxing ferrous components for cracks and in one case checking an aluminum head for cracks using a dye process. Cylinder boring to clean up the cylinders. The engines needed no other machine work. I did all the assembly work myself.

I dare say a shop capable of properly rebuilding a Hellcat engine is probably not that common.

So in the event the Hellcat engine in my car died to the point a rebuild was called for I'd probably opt for a factory replacement engine. This of course depends upon the cost. While the cost might be "affordable" now in 5 or 10 years the cost might be prohibitive.

Or if I was faced with the need to rebuild the Hellcat engine I might just consider selling the car as a roller and moving on. If the Hellcat engine required a rebuild it would be the first of a number of new cars that I have owned and in 4 cars put 150K to 317K miles on without even having to touch the engines let alone rebuild them.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Set aside the cost of a replacement engine.

An engine needing a rebuild in under 100K+ miles is rare. Actually in my experience an engine needing a rebuild at any time is rare. I've driven a number of cars to 150K miles and beyond and the engines were fine.

However, I rebuilt two engines. One because I wanted to for the experience and the other because after I bought the vehicle I found the cam bearings were gone. Nothing catastrophic just the results from an engine spending way too much time idling with the resulting low amount of oil flow the cam bearings.

If the engine suffers some mechanical failure I was told it is generally not advisable to use that as a rebuild starting place. An engine that suffers from lack of oil or from overheating are other examples of engines that are best not rebuilt.

When I was in the engine rebuilding mode I had access to a very good auto engine machine shop. My auto tech buddies used it and recommended it and it proved to be a good shop. Nothing fancy though just hot tanking and magnafluxing ferrous components for cracks and in one case checking an aluminum head for cracks using a dye process. Cylinder boring to clean up the cylinders. The engines needed no other machine work. I did all the assembly work myself.

I dare say a shop capable of properly rebuilding a Hellcat engine is probably not that common.

So in the event the Hellcat engine in my car died to the point a rebuild was called for I'd probably opt for a factory replacement engine. This of course depends upon the cost. While the cost might be "affordable" now in 5 or 10 years the cost might be prohibitive.

Or if I was faced with the need to rebuild the Hellcat engine I might just consider selling the car as a roller and moving on. If the Hellcat engine required a rebuild it would be the first of a number of new cars that I have owned and in 4 cars put 150K to 317K miles on without even having to touch the engines let alone rebuild them.
Thank you for your comprehensive answer.
A new engine is around $15k and prob close to $20k installed, all said and done. My issue is I’m still financing and just found out my warranty is ending in early 2021 rather than 2023 as initially thought.
If this car had a much lower cost engine and or I wasn’t still financing I wouldn’t care. I wouldn’t have bought the car initially if I new it only had the 5/60 at the time.
I’m probably overthinking this.
 

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I typically don't keep my performance cars past their powertrain warranty. Normal car I wouldn't care but the Hellcat motor cost a lot more than the average car. I may also consider modding down the road and want to see what I should generally put aside in case of a failure for piece of mind. $15k, $20k??
People that mod don't plan for this?

As I said in my original post, I thought I bought a CPO car and was covered 7/100k but the dealer lied and I won't be covered past 5/21.
I could jump ship and trade up to a lightly used redeye. Just trying to weight my options and whether or not keeping my current HC is overall worth it.
I suppose since you say you're not "mechanical", I would do what Rockster says if you're worried about the engine failing....just start saving a little at a time until you can afford a replacement engine (plus installation labor) if needed. There's always good used salvage engines out there also to consider. You may want to reconsider modding in the future if longevity if your engine is a great concern. There's cheaper platforms to race with honestly.

Paying others to install all the mods as well as tuning can get real expensive. I've always worked on my own stuff, but I have my limitations...I've rebuilt several engines, and I can turn wrenches...but....I won't try to tune my own car. I'd rather leave it to those that have more experience with that than me because a mistake in tuning can wipe out the entire engine quickly.
 

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Thank you for your comprehensive answer.
A new engine is around $15k and prob close to $20k installed, all said and done. My issue is I’m still financing and just found out my warranty is ending in early 2021 rather than 2023 as initially thought.
If this car had a much lower cost engine and or I wasn’t still financing I wouldn’t care. I wouldn’t have bought the car initially if I new it only had the 5/60 at the time.
I’m probably overthinking this.
Maybe you are overthinking this or maybe not.

If the fear of facing an unaffordable engine rebuild/replacement down the road with the Hellcat keeps you awake at nights maybe you need to get rid of the Hellcat now while it still has some warranty (and has the most value as a used car it will have going forward) and is an easier sell?

While I don't expect your Hellcat engine (nor the engine in my Hellcat) to need anything for some considerable big number of miles, no one can see the future.

BTW, if you want even more trouble sleeping at night, while I have never had to rebuild an engine -- well, except that D200 pickup which I bought used and only learned the cam bearings were going bad after I bought it -- I have had 2 cars hit and one destroyed. One car was hit two times and one was hit just once but totaled. Only 4 weeks old, too.

Oh, and in one car -- the one I bought to replace the one that was totaled -- just about 2 weeks after I bought it I hit a mule deer with the car and the car required 2 months in the body/paint shop and over $25K to fix. Paid for by insurance thank goodness.

More cars are lost to accidents than blown engines.

Reminds me: Yet another car of mine while the engine was fine the car was fine there was a problem that manifested in a CEL. Took the car to a dealer and the dealer made 2 attempts to find and address the issue. This after I had done some thing son my own and while the engine was running better the CEL would still come on. CEL pointed to a problem with the secondary air injection system. It appeared to work ok -- the pump would come on at cold start and then shut off. The problem was that after a drive of some miles when I'd roll up to a stop the CEL would come after as the engine idled. Engine didn't act up, idling normally, and then the CEL would come on.

I'm in CA no CEL is allowed or the car can't be registered and if not registered it can't be insured or driven. One can get a one year waiver (for IIRC $600) but the 2nd year the car has to be brought into compliance.

Took the car to another dealer. The service department tried a number of things -- had the car a month -- but never ID'd the problem. We had an agreement the diagnosis would cost me $125 and that's all I paid. Now if the problem had been ID'd and had it not been too much money I would have gladly paid up.

But after a month no luck. The SM told me I would have to leave the car with a blank check and maybe the engine would have to come out of the car even be torn down to get the root cause of the CEL and the secondary air injection problem. Car was not worth a blank check and it needed more work besides getting the CEL cause addressed. The car needed a clutch and flywheel and that would have run around $4K; so I just drove the car back home and stopped by my local dealer and arranged to sell the car to the dealer.

A "perfectly" fine car -- albeit 16 years old -- and everything worked -- A/C,heater, lights, top, etc. -- taken off the road by not a worn out engine just some hard to diagnose problem with the secondary air injection system.

If the engine in my Hellcat failed out of warranty and I was faced with a $20K bill while I could afford it I might as I mentioned in my previous post just sell the Hellcat as a "roller" and move on. $20K would then be applied to another car purchase along with what I get for the Hellcat or I just bank the money, well, leave the money in the bank. I have a 2nd car and could get by with just one car going forward. Heck my 2nd car (a MINI JCW) only cost around $33K back in Dec. 2017 and I could come near buying a current model for that much (and I could afford it) and buy a 2nd car.

As an aside I watched Jay Leno's Garage on YT the other day and viewed his review of the new C8. If didn't hate GM with all my heart for what GM techs did to my GTO when I had it in for service I'd sell my Hellcat now and buy a C8. Hate to admit it but I was feeling the urge to forgive and forget just so I could buy a C8...

While I want at least one car and while working I like to have 2 cars, I don't need either car to be a Hellcat.
 

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Thank you for your comprehensive answer.
A new engine is around $15k and prob close to $20k installed, all said and done. My issue is I’m still financing and just found out my warranty is ending in early 2021 rather than 2023 as initially thought.
If this car had a much lower cost engine and or I wasn’t still financing I wouldn’t care. I wouldn’t have bought the car initially if I new it only had the 5/60 at the time.
I’m probably overthinking this.
if you're concerned, you can probably buy an extended warranty thru Dodge. The $1500-2500 spent for the warranty would cover pretty much everything and would probably ease your mind.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
if you're concerned, you can probably buy an extended warranty thru Dodge. The $1500-2500 spent for the warranty would cover pretty much everything and would probably ease your mind.
I’d love to; however, I believe you can’t extend the factory warranty after 3 years?
I have a 2016
 
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