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Theirs many air oil separators for a multitude of cars but for a hellcat i cant find a single one that drains back into the car, all the one’s ive seen you must change with every oil change religiously. Can anyone link me one that doesnt need to he drained and drains back in? Every search usually brings me to iag oil separators but they’re only for subarus, and ive seen some for gtr’s but none for dodge that do this? If theirs a reason why they can not do this please let me know?
 

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I don't think it's ideal to put the products of a functioning catch can back into the oil...in fact, many instructions say DO NOT put the fluid into the oil pan...have you seen what is in a catch can?
 

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Theirs many air oil separators for a multitude of cars but for a hellcat i cant find a single one that drains back into the car, all the one’s ive seen you must change with every oil change religiously. Can anyone link me one that doesnt need to he drained and drains back in? Every search usually brings me to iag oil separators but they’re only for subarus, and ive seen some for gtr’s but none for dodge that do this? If theirs a reason why they can not do this please let me know?
Most likely the Hellcat engine has some oil separator that removes oil vapor from the crankcase fumes before the fumes are then routed to the intake manifold. Has to have this or the engine would lose copious amounts of oil in the form of oil vapor to the intake.

A bit of oil vapor makes it through and some is caught by the catch can. (If one bothers to check if the intake manifold walls are wet with oil that's a sign the catch can doesn't catch all the oil vapor.) The water is in vapor form but can cool down as it enters the catch can and revert back into liquid. This presents a problem in that the catch can can fill up with water and this puts the engine at risk of hydrolocking if the engine manages to ingest a slug of water (with some oil on it) from the can.

While I don't know what the Hellcat oil separator looks like, with other cars the crankcase fumes flow through an oil separator which is patterned after a Nautilus shell which is a logarithmic spiral to force the heaver oil vapor particles out of the fumes and against the wall of the oil separator where they reform into liquid oil. The bottom of the housing is open and connected to the crankcases via a hose so the oil can drain down and return to the crankcase.

The water vapor as long as the temperature stays high enough remain vapor and continue on to the intake manifold.

The Hellcat oil separator is probably not that sophisticated. But it doesn't have to be. Just a series of sharp changes in flow is enough to cause the oil vapor particles to come in contact with the inner surfaces of the oil separator and then revert back to liquid oil and run down to the top of the head where the oil then eventually flows back to the oil pan.
 

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My catch can had a few table spoons of oil in it at my last oil change. The interval was only 1200 miles, but Im certain it would take several thousand to fill it. Not to mention you would not go that many between oil changes. Also, there’s no water in the catch can, only oil that has condensed back to liquid.
546938
 

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Most likely the Hellcat engine has some oil separator that removes oil vapor from the crankcase fumes before the fumes are then routed to the intake manifold. Has to have this or the engine would lose copious amounts of oil in the form of oil vapor to the intake.

A bit of oil vapor makes it through and some is caught by the catch can. (If one bothers to check if the intake manifold walls are wet with oil that's a sign the catch can doesn't catch all the oil vapor.) The water is in vapor form but can cool down as it enters the catch can and revert back into liquid. This presents a problem in that the catch can can fill up with water and this puts the engine at risk of hydrolocking if the engine manages to ingest a slug of water (with some oil on it) from the can.

While I don't know what the Hellcat oil separator looks like, with other cars the crankcase fumes flow through an oil separator which is patterned after a Nautilus shell which is a logarithmic spiral to force the heaver oil vapor particles out of the fumes and against the wall of the oil separator where they reform into liquid oil. The bottom of the housing is open and connected to the crankcases via a hose so the oil can drain down and return to the crankcase.

The water vapor as long as the temperature stays high enough remain vapor and continue on to the intake manifold.

The Hellcat oil separator is probably not that sophisticated. But it doesn't have to be. Just a series of sharp changes in flow is enough to cause the oil vapor particles to come in contact with the inner surfaces of the oil separator and then revert back to liquid oil and run down to the top of the head where the oil then eventually flows back to the oil pan.
The stock hellcat has one already built in? What about a 392? I have a 392, my father has a hellcat charger
 

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My catch can had a few table spoons of oil in it at my last oil change. The interval was only 1200 miles, but Im certain it would take several thousand to fill it. Not to mention you would not go that many between oil changes. Also, there’s no water in the catch can, only oil that has condensed back to liquid.
View attachment 546938
Thats your passenger side catch can?
 

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if you drive during winter months water will condense in the catch can and give you a bit of a milky texture. You dont want to be dumping that back into the car.

Subarus are one of the main cars Im familiar with where 98% of their catch cans use an air/oil separator that returns the oil back to the pan. The GOOD ones have coolant running around/through them to keep them warm in the winter months to help prevent condensation. I suppose the do this because with those motors, the can has to be put in a pretty much inaccessable area so they cant easily be drained by hand.

The hellcat and 392 catch cans are mounted rigth out in front of the motor where you can easily unscrew the bottom and dump out the oil. Why would you want to complicate that.
 

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@rayzazoo had this posted up a while back. *Note Passenger side only is needed
"rayzazoo, post: 3347121, member: 587"]
cwj Here are the highlights. Summed up, a passenger side catch can is estimated to catch between 1 1/8 to 2 1/4 quarts of oil over 216,000 miles or between 0.5 - 0.7% oil consumption over the life of the engine.

"Specifics aside, I think it raises questions and gets the point across for a majority of Hellcat drivers:

(1) Is a catch can necessary?
(2) Is the oil consumption enough to warrant a performance loss?"

Reference: http://www.hellcat.org/threads/oil-catch-can-study.17038/page-2#post-390061

"Hellcats do have "catch cans" installed in the upper orange rocker arm cover ("L" shape bulge). It is a labyrinth style air/oil separator.

A catch can requires maintenance and if not maintained, can overfill. This is the reason it's not included from the factory vs the built in air/oil separator that is maintenance free.

There's no doubt that an aftermarket catch can does catch oil and will keep the intake tract cleaner. Calculated out, depending on driving style and consumption a rate of 0.5 tbsp per 1,000 miles.

216,000 miles = 72.0 oz (2.250 qts) of oil out of 9216 oz (216 qts) = 0.7 % oil consumption over the life of the engine

Or 1 teaspoon of oil per approximately every 333 miles driven (about a tank of gas when driven on the highway)"

Reference: http://www.hellcat.org/threads/oil-catch-can-yes-no-brand.10378/page-6#post-270614

"Also, based upon the amount of oil collected through the passenger side catch can;

1,500 miles = 0.5 oz of oil consumed/caught.
6,000 miles = 2 oz of oil out of 192 oz = 1.0% oil consumption every factory recommended oil change.
36,000 miles = 1 1/2 cups of oil consumed/caught.
216,000 miles = 1 1/8 quarts of oil out of 216 quarts = 0.5% oil consumption over the life of the engine."


Reference: http://www.hellcat.org/threads/oil-catch-can-study.17038/#post-389974

This one has the comparison of a 6.1L Hemi engine with and without a catch can.
http://www.hellcat.org/threads/oil-catch-can-yes-no-brand.10378/page-6#post-270811


Linda :)[/QUOTE]
 

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On the drivers side I have a Metco Breather
="Linda's Hell Cat, post: 3908977, member: 5026"]
There is my Hellcat Charger Engine bay showing the Metco Breather Popped on at the Track in 2015 by my Husband @Top Cat and its still doing a fantastic job!

Linda :)

546966
 

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Discussion Starter #11
if you drive during winter months water will condense in the catch can and give you a bit of a milky texture. You dont want to be dumping that back into the car.

Subarus are one of the main cars Im familiar with where 98% of their catch cans use an air/oil separator that returns the oil back to the pan. The GOOD ones have coolant running around/through them to keep them warm in the winter months to help prevent condensation. I suppose the do this because with those motors, the can has to be put in a pretty much inaccessable area so they cant easily be drained by hand.

The hellcat and 392 catch cans are mounted rigth out in front of the motor where you can easily unscrew the bottom and dump out the oil. Why would you want to complicate that.
After seeing my friends motor get ****** up by driving it from maine to Florida because his catchcan was overflowing, i would rather over complicate it for the ensured safety. Also thank you for stating about the coolant i didnt think about that.
 

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After seeing my friends motor get ** up by driving it from maine to Florida because his catchcan was overflowing, i would rather over complicate it for the ensured safety. Also thank you for stating about the coolant i didnt think about that.
This is also granted something mustve been horribly wrong with his motor for it to fill so quickly from a roughly im guessing 1200 miles drive
 

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After seeing my friends motor get ** up by driving it from maine to Florida because his catchcan was overflowing, i would rather over complicate it for the ensured safety. Also thank you for stating about the coolant i didnt think about that.
wow, Ive never heard of that happening. Mine has gotten near full after 6000 miles on occaision, always assumed it would just stop catching the oil and eat whatever went by normally.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Po
wow, Ive never heard of that happening. Mine has gotten near full after 6000 miles on occaision, always assumed it would just stop catching the oil and eat whatever went by normally.
Maybe their are some out their that do stop once they are full and let the air pass through, i will do my research but his definitely did not stop.
 
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