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Challenger SRT Redeye
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I have a ‘19 Redeye with an aftermarket K&N intake. I’ve been told by my local shop mechanic that I should also put on an oil separator as well, due to the increased air. Any thoughts or tips?
Thanks!
 

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Challenger SRT Hellcat Redeye Widebody Octane Red
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If that is how they explained it, I would question the shop. I run JLT catch cans on my vehicles to catch any oil that would normally be burned. It's not required, but it helps my OCD. I am keeping my car long-term so for me it's just an extra measure.
 
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Challenger SRT 392
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Catch cans are a great option to help keep your engine clean by catching most of the blow by. Check out the link listed below:


- Alexis
 

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Charger SRT Hellcat
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It's been debated for quite some time as to whether you truly need one or not. It's for you to decide but one way to determine is by monitoring your oil levels. On my car I noticed that the oil levels were dropping a very slight amount in between oil changes. I pulled off one of the spark plugs to check for signs of oil being burned in the combustion chamber and it didn't show any.

Given my experience with other cars I've owned I decide not to chance it and installed a JTL on my car and it works great at catching oil. I also added a Metco breather for the drivers side (Not sure if this is really needed but it's cheap enough). You also don't need a mechanic to install it for you. There is a step-by-step video on YouTube and it only takes 15 minutes with basic hand tools.
 

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2020 Challenger Hellcat
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904 Posts
Catch cans are a great option to help keep your engine clean by catching most of the blow by. Check out the link listed below:


- Alexis
Cleanliness doesn't matter. In force inducted engines, they maintain the octane rating of the fuel in the combustion chambers. Oil is effectively 0 octane, and too much oil (caused by higher crankcase pressures in boosted engines) reduces the octane rating and robs power as the PCM pulls timing. Catch cans help to prevent this.

Who cares if sludge builds up in an engine over 20 years? I've never once seen anyone have an engine fail caused by oil residue buildup in the throttle body/intake runners. While they can look unsightly, the reality is they're micrometers thick. It hardly robs any power or inhibits normal function of the engine.
 

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I care if the sludge builds up, so I added one to my car. It is not an expensive mod, so I'd rather be safe the sorry. With the amount of cans we sell daily, many people agree. ;)

Screen Shot 2021-05-26 at 4.59.03 PM.png


To each their own, enjoy your ride.

- Alexis
 

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2020 Challenger Hellcat
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904 Posts
I care if the sludge builds up, so I added one to my car. It is not an expensive mod, so I'd rather be safe the sorry. With the amount of cans we sell daily, many people agree. ;)

View attachment 574530

To each their own, enjoy your ride.

- Alexis
Well, if you would market your product correctly, you'd probably sell more. Sludge as shown does not and has never inhibited performance or maintainability on any car in the history of the internal combustion engine. However, for FI cars, a catch can does have a measurable performance benefit... but using snake oil pictures showing something that is in no way a problem of any kind and saying a catch can will solve the problem that isn't a problem is not how to go about it.
 

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2020 Challenger Hellcat
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I care if the sludge builds up, so I added one to my car. It is not an expensive mod, so I'd rather be safe the sorry. With the amount of cans we sell daily, many people agree. ;)

View attachment 574530

To each their own, enjoy your ride.

- Alexis
574532


As an example, this is a 383 V8 intake off of a 60 year old vehicle that I'm currently working on. It is uncleaned internally and the engine has over 190,000 miles on it. Prior to disassembly, it worked absolutely great. It was absolutely pitch black through and through... but if you scrape it lightly with a fingernail, that "sludge" buildup is just uniform light surface buildup. It doesn't inhibit the function of the engine or impede flow whatsoever. The combustion chamber and cylinder sleeves are clean as a whistle.

Now, the intake valves on this engine needed replacing. 60+ years of use combined with sitting around, combined with fuel and spark plug issues caused buildup of unspent fuel due to being ran too rich for too long... and it had hard carbon buildup there. But, a catch can doesn't do anything for that. Anything that gets into the combustion chamber is either ignited and vaporized, or expelled on the exhaust stroke. Thus, leaving the engine internals relatively clean.

On older engines, the case can be made that a catch can may prevent some minor carbon buildup on the valves, but as I explained earlier, 60 years of buildup in this engine (which is easily double to triple as "dirty" as modern engines during operation) produced only minimal thickness of deposits. The problem with the sticky valves on this engine was related to bad spark and unspent fuel gumming up everything. That did more damage to the engine in 3 months than 60 years of a dirty PCV system shoving oil aerosol down the intake.
 
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