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Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody
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Discussion Starter #1
Burnout question. I’m not much of a rolling burnout guy but this day I thought I would give it a try. 2018 HCWB, Car was set to sport mode and traction control completely off. Just tapped the little peddle with a slight foot brake and the rubber was burning. Off the brakes for a few yards then shifted into second still very little pedal and mucho smoke. Hit 3rd and the car started to skate off the straight track to the left. I got off the throttle with zero rear visibility due to the humongous cloud of smoke 50 yards behind, the car started roll right then left rather violently. I did not hit the brakes or over steer, I just was trying to keep the car in the lane. I think I was only at 30 mph or so. There was pleanty of room on both sides but I can see how it could get out of control without our friend the computer. Usually getting off the throttle would bring my other drag car out of the burnout box straight after boiling the slicks. I know there is not much mile per hour out of the water at the track and that’s the issue I guess. Did I do something wrong or were the rear tires just hooking up causing the yaw issue?
 

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Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody
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Driveshaft inertia. Once there's no traction in back, the driveshaft inertia causes the car to yaw. That plus the trans means there's a LOT of spinning heavy components.

Make sacrifice to the rubber tire god Vulcan and enjoy your day! :)
 

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Challenger SRT Hellcat 6MT
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...Car was set to sport mode and traction control completely off...
I'm not sure you understand the controls correctly. The button by the shifter that you probably pushed is not "traction control", it is "stability control".

"Traction control" will modulate the torque applied to the rear wheels to keep rear tires from slipping (excessively). This helps keeping the car straight, but that's not the main purpose. Basically, "traction control" doesn't want you to spin tires. It also serves to maximize traction (theoretically, at least).

"Stability control" acts to keep car is pointed according to the steering input by applying different brake efforts to individual wheels (including front wheels) and/or modulating throttle. Basically, stability control doesn't want you to go sideways. If you spin tires, but go straight, the stability control is happy.

The drive modes (set on the screen) in HC can be a bit confusing. The "traction" setting changes both traction and stability controls in a non-trivial (but nicely thought-out) way. Here it is:

1. Traction on "Street": both stability and traction control are at their max.

2. Traction on "Sport": traction control is OFF, stability control is partially engaged. If you want to do burnouts while going somewhat straight, you want this setting. Of course, with the Hellcat torque you can overpower the stability control, but that takes a bit more than a slight tap on the gas pedal. Burnouts, on the other hand, are easy in this mode.

3. Traction on "Track": stability control is OFF, but traction control is partially engaged. This is optimized for track; you can go sideways (the engineers expected that you know what you are doing if you engage this mode).

On top of that, in any of the modes above you can completely disable the stability control by pressing the button next to the shifter.

Bottom line: if you want to do a rolling burnout while staying reasonably safe, you want to select the "sport" mode on the screen, and leave the stability control button next to the shifter alone.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm not sure you understand the controls correctly. The button by the shifter that you probably pushed is not "traction control", it is "stability control".

"Traction control" will modulate the torque applied to the rear wheels to keep rear tires from slipping (excessively). This helps keeping the car straight, but that's not the main purpose. Basically, "traction control" doesn't want you to spin tires. It also serves to maximize traction (theoretically, at least).

"Stability control" acts to keep car is pointed according to the steering input by applying different brake efforts to individual wheels (including front wheels) and/or modulating throttle. Basically, stability control doesn't want you to go sideways. If you spin tires, but go straight, the stability control is happy.

The drive modes (set on the screen) in HC can be a bit confusing. The "traction" setting changes both traction and stability controls in a non-trivial (but nicely thought-out) way. Here it is:

1. Traction on "Street": both stability and traction control are at their max.

2. Traction on "Sport": traction control is OFF, stability control is partially engaged. If you want to do burnouts while going somewhat straight, you want this setting. Of course, with the Hellcat torque you can overpower the stability control, but that takes a bit more than a slight tap on the gas pedal. Burnouts, on the other hand, are easy in this mode.

3. Traction on "Track": stability control is OFF, but traction control is partially engaged. This is optimized for track; you can go sideways (the engineers expected that you know what you are doing if you engage this mode).

On top of that, in any of the modes above you can completely disable the stability control by pressing the button next to the shifter.

Bottom line: if you want to do a burnout while staying reasonably safe, you want to select the "sport" mode on the screen, and leave the stability control button next to the shifter alone.
You would be correct. My reason for turning off the stability control was not to over heat the rear brakes. I thought I read a thread that advised to disable it. Thanks
 

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You would be correct. My reason for turning off the stability control was not to over heat the rear brakes. I thought I read a thread that advised to disable it. Thanks
2018 doesn't have the factory line lock, eh?
 

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Challenger SRT Redeye
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I'm not sure you understand the controls correctly. The button by the shifter that you probably pushed is not "traction control", it is "stability control".

"Traction control" will modulate the torque applied to the rear wheels to keep rear tires from slipping (excessively). This helps keeping the car straight, but that's not the main purpose. Basically, "traction control" doesn't want you to spin tires. It also serves to maximize traction (theoretically, at least).

"Stability control" acts to keep car is pointed according to the steering input by applying different brake efforts to individual wheels (including front wheels) and/or modulating throttle. Basically, stability control doesn't want you to go sideways. If you spin tires, but go straight, the stability control is happy.

The drive modes (set on the screen) in HC can be a bit confusing. The "traction" setting changes both traction and stability controls in a non-trivial (but nicely thought-out) way. Here it is:

1. Traction on "Street": both stability and traction control are at their max.

2. Traction on "Sport": traction control is OFF, stability control is partially engaged. If you want to do burnouts while going somewhat straight, you want this setting. Of course, with the Hellcat torque you can overpower the stability control, but that takes a bit more than a slight tap on the gas pedal. Burnouts, on the other hand, are easy in this mode.

3. Traction on "Track": stability control is OFF, but traction control is partially engaged. This is optimized for track; you can go sideways (the engineers expected that you know what you are doing if you engage this mode).

On top of that, in any of the modes above you can completely disable the stability control by pressing the button next to the shifter.

Bottom line: if you want to do a burnout while staying reasonably safe, you want to select the "sport" mode on the screen, and leave the stability control button next to the shifter alone.
Where did you get that info? Printed or your experience?
 

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Challenger SRT Redeye
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It must be changed year by year in your Manual. What caught my eye is that your post indicates Stability Control is OFF in Track Mode. That is not true on a ‘15 or a ‘19. I know that from experience.
 

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For rolling burnouts use Sport mode traction, and Track mode for transmission and let the transmission shift itself. It will allow all the tire spin you want and keep the car fairly straight. Here is a video of a car that looks like mine in that mode.

 

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It must be changed year by year in your Manual. What caught my eye is that your post indicates Stability Control is OFF in Track Mode. That is not true on a ‘15 or a ‘19. I know that from experience.
Well, I guess this nanny never sleeps, just naps...

2015 manual:

• Track
Press the “Track” button on the touchscreen to modify traction control to optimize track performance with the least stability control.

• Sport
Press the “Sport” button on the touchscreen to turn off traction control and reduce stability control.

• Street
Press the “Street” button on the touchscreen to provide full traction control and full stability control
 

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For rolling burnouts use Sport mode traction, and Track mode for transmission and let the transmission shift itself. It will allow all the tire spin you want and keep the car fairly straight...

Yep, that's what I said ^^^. Only my transmission somehow never shifts itself. I guess because it's manual lol...
 

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Challenger SRT Redeye
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Well, I guess this nanny never sleeps, just naps...

2015 manual:

• Track
Press the “Track” button on the touchscreen to modify traction control to optimize track performance with the least stability control.

• Sport
Press the “Sport” button on the touchscreen to turn off traction control and reduce stability control.

• Street
Press the “Street” button on the touchscreen to provide full traction control and full stability control
Ha, true. Sometime soon I’ll try to just cancel all the modes while up on the track and see if I can feel it or the lap times change. I always use Track Mode. If I can get consistent lap times next Monday, I’ll try it.
 

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Ha, true. Sometime soon I’ll try to just cancel all the modes while up on the track and see if I can feel it or the lap times change. I always use Track Mode. If I can get consistent lap times next Monday, I’ll try it.
From the manual it looks like if you put traction in "Sport" and turn off the stability control with a button near the shifter, all the nannies should go away completely. I'm not sure it's going to improve lap times, but I'm pretty sure it will be fun. Certainly a manly thing to try (I mean you need balls to run a HC like that lol)...
 

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I'm not sure you understand the controls correctly. The button by the shifter that you probably pushed is not "traction control", it is "stability control".

"Traction control" will modulate the torque applied to the rear wheels to keep rear tires from slipping (excessively). This helps keeping the car straight, but that's not the main purpose. Basically, "traction control" doesn't want you to spin tires. It also serves to maximize traction (theoretically, at least).

"Stability control" acts to keep car is pointed according to the steering input by applying different brake efforts to individual wheels (including front wheels) and/or modulating throttle. Basically, stability control doesn't want you to go sideways. If you spin tires, but go straight, the stability control is happy.

The drive modes (set on the screen) in HC can be a bit confusing. The "traction" setting changes both traction and stability controls in a non-trivial (but nicely thought-out) way. Here it is:

1. Traction on "Street": both stability and traction control are at their max.

2. Traction on "Sport": traction control is OFF, stability control is partially engaged. If you want to do burnouts while going somewhat straight, you want this setting. Of course, with the Hellcat torque you can overpower the stability control, but that takes a bit more than a slight tap on the gas pedal. Burnouts, on the other hand, are easy in this mode.

3. Traction on "Track": stability control is OFF, but traction control is partially engaged. This is optimized for track; you can go sideways (the engineers expected that you know what you are doing if you engage this mode).

On top of that, in any of the modes above you can completely disable the stability control by pressing the button next to the shifter.

Bottom line: if you want to do a rolling burnout while staying reasonably safe, you want to select the "sport" mode on the screen, and leave the stability control button next to the shifter alone.
Very good explanation of the drive modes and traction/stability function akras!
 

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2017 Daytona 392
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This thread's been derailed a bit, but in my tazer'd '17 setting the car to "track" through the performance pages doesn't adjust traction or stability control at all. I have to do that manually be tapping or long-pressing the traction/stability button on the center console to set Sport or Track. The latter disables forward-collision warning and braking as well.
 
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