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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever owned a 5th gen Z28, if so how did you like it and how does it compare to your Hellcat? What are some things you like over one or the other?
 

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You're comparing watermelons to croissants with this comparison. To put it simply, there isn't a comparison.

I belong to a car club where we race out of a few local tracks (within about 200 miles of us). One of our members has a Z28. And, part of the deal with our club is that we routinely swap keys. I've driven his Z28 probably 50 times over 3 years, maybe 100 laps or so. He's gotten to drive my Esprit, Hellcat, and GT350. Now, a good comparison is the GT350 vs the Z28. They're both relatively lightweight, track focused, RWD, NA corner carvers. A Challenger Hellcat is none of these things.

A Hellcat can carve corners... about as well as a goldfish can go down a flight of stairs on its own. It has no poise, no graceful entries/exits. It's a brute. I own a Hellcat and I know full well just how borderline graceless my 'Cat is on a road course. Both the Z28 and GT350 are very predictable on turn-in, with solid transitions to the apex and egress. Rolling on power in these cars is no issue. In theory, I could do some work to the Hellcat and get it to handle track work better, but I don't buy a new set of flip-flops and go run a 100m dash. I'd just buy a proper set of running shoes... which is also why I own a proper track car.

Now, let's look at what happens on a double left/right chicane in a Hellcat. Lots of tracks like to put these after a short straight. So, in a Hellcat, you're likely pushing 100mph or so, and to slow for the turn, you angle the car to the outside and brake. Braking is one of this car's 2 only positives on a road track. The brakes bite nicely, but as you turn in towards the apex, imagine a snowplow blowing through 4 feet of snow. It's heavy and the oversteer is real. The rear end would love nothing more than to come on around too. Even with the suspension dialed in to track, there's enough body roll to induce sea sickness if you're squeamish. Right, left slosh to the side, and back to the right as you plow your way through the turns. Now, it's time to roll on the power and accelerate out.

Even with Goodyear track tires on the car, you still have to be mindful of dropping the hammer and your track poise ends up being very similar to spirited driving on the street. Too much gas and the Hellcat goes up in smoke, thus reducing your E/T. Where it does shine though, for perk numero dos is its straightaway speed. No other car at the track, sans any super cars out that day, are going to put up top speeds like the Hellcat will. Buuuuut, there's a downside. All good straights come to an and, then it's back to snowplowing and body rolling.

It's really great fun. But it's really kinda slow, all things told.

The GT350 and the Z28 both will murder a Hellcat on a closed track. So, for pure performance output on a track, Hellcat is not my tool of choice. It's not even in my top 20.

Now, for off-track use, it's Hellcat all day, every day. I daily drive mine. It's larger, more comfortable, it's perfectly civilized for street work. The Z28 and Shelby... not so much. I can only stomach driving a Z28 for about 15 minutes before every fiber of my being wants out of the car. It's cramped, ultra rigid, loud road noise, and I can't see out of the damn thing... and I'm 6'5". I've driven the Z28 from northern Alabama to central Florida in one day's jaunt back from the race track. It was only supposed to be from N. AL to Birmingham where we were supposed to swap keys again, but noooo. My buddy refused and left me at the gas station before I could swap with him, so I got stuck in the damn Z28 the rest of the way. I tried to catch up to him, but my Hellcat put 3-5 miles on me in his Z28 and he stopped answering my calls. Thankfully I knew where the lamer lived... and he owns 2 Ferraris, so if he screwed up my car, I'd have taken his 488 Pista for a grand tour of the eastern seaboard.

He and I both agreed, once we reached home, that my Hellcat and his Z28 are no more related than battleships are to chopsticks. In the Z28, you feel every concrete spacer on the interstate... thump-thump-thump-thump x 160 miles. But, regardless what that 35mph exit speed sign says, the Z28 can do it at 80. My Hellcat, I'm feeling saucy at 55-60. The Z28 drives and feels like a go-cart. Only the engine is in the front and the go-cart offers better visibility and has a more comfortable seat. My Hellcat, with all of its 717 fire breathing horsepuppies and SRT whatsits and doo-dads, it handles the open road like a yacht cruising on a lake with, "I'm on a boat!" blaring everywhere you go. It has the feel of plush captain's chairs, a commanding view forward and to the sides (we don't talk about a yacht's blind spots). Plus, when I need to lay the smack down on someone, I am in fact driving the automobile equivalent of the Yamato. Accept no substitute, but the Hellcat is the king of the road in this comparison (in almost every comparison, for that matter). You just can't beat a car that's comfortable, poised, civilized, that's also mated to a screaming 717hp supercharged engine. Many cars can be comfortable, but they're usually slow. Many cars can be top performers, but they're really not good to spend time in (Z28, my Elise, any of the new 911s). But, the Hellcat is both in a straight line. It's FUN in the corners, but only because fishtailing and throwing screaming supercharger induced tire smoke 20x per lap is FUN. It's slow, but it's FUN. Did I mention that the Hellcat's trunk is gigantic? Again, if you're going to use it for things people use cars for, the Hellcat can do it all.

So, in summary. The Z28 is a track toy. It's misery everywhere else. Even the owner of said Z28 agrees. Off the track, it is eclipsed in every way by the ZL1... and the Z28 was more expensive (original MSRP anyway). If you want to develop a walk that looks like you just got off your trusty horse after a long day's riding on the range, try and daily drive a Z28. In a couple days' time you'll age your legs and spine by 15 years and gain an addiction to ranch beans and harmonica tunes. The Hellcat, you can drive it for 8-10 hours and feel RESTED when you get out.

That's all I have to say about that.
 

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Xylander, your post is the best description I’ve ready yet describing why I just ordered a Hellcat. Thank you!
 

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So, the 5th Gen Camaro (outside of the ZL1) are all fairly slow cars in stock form period. They're just not going to compare to a Hellcat in a straight line. Xylander hit on this a few times in his post. The only place the Z28 would dominate the Hellcat is when you turn left or right, and it's showed that on the track against the GT500 who had like 150 more hp...

Now, where I will disagree with Xylander is on this..


It's larger. It's cramped, and I can't see out of the damn thing... and I'm 6'5".
The cars are practically identical in length, height, interior dimensions etc...
Camaro = 190.4 inches long, 75.5 inches wide, 54.2 inches height
Challenger = 198 inches long, 76 inches wide, 57-58 inches height

About the only big difference on the interior is about 1.5 inches of headroom that does favor the Challenger. They all have the same blind spots, they all have the same issues in terms of visibility. The Challenger gets the nod "just" at being bigger, but it's also about a good 15 inches longer when you factor in the body panels/bumpers.

The Z28 was a pure track car, it is not something I would ever recommend as a daily driver. In fact, I would actually recommend buying a newer 6th Gen 1LE SS Camaro as it dusts the Z28 even with less HP.
 

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So, the 5th Gen Camaro (outside of the ZL1) are all fairly slow cars in stock form period. They're just not going to compare to a Hellcat in a straight line. Xylander hit on this a few times in his post. The only place the Z28 would dominate the Hellcat is when you turn left or right, and it's showed that on the track against the GT500 who had like 150 more hp...

Now, where I will disagree with Xylander is on this..




The cars are practically identical in length, height, interior dimensions etc...
Camaro = 190.4 inches long, 75.5 inches wide, 54.2 inches height
Challenger = 198 inches long, 76 inches wide, 57-58 inches height

About the only big difference on the interior is about 1.5 inches of headroom that does favor the Challenger. They all have the same blind spots, they all have the same issues in terms of visibility. The Challenger gets the nod "just" at being bigger, but it's also about a good 15 inches longer when you factor in the body panels/bumpers.

The Z28 was a pure track car, it is not something I would ever recommend as a daily driver. In fact, I would actually recommend buying a newer 6th Gen 1LE SS Camaro as it dusts the Z28 even with less HP.
Disagree. The door height is much higher on the Camaro. While the Camaro has similar leg room for length, it has much narrower width. In my car, I can "man spread" to the point where my left foot is on the dead pedal and my right knee is barely touching the center console. In the Camaro and Mustang, I am pinned in.

So, the cars don't have the same blind spots. The rear visibility on the Challenger is much better. The side-to-side visibility is much better (again, higher doors. This is what gives the Camaro the "bunker port" view that many folks, me included, dislike). Although the Camaro has the pony car style center "bubble" for headroom, it slopes down towards the door and you're left with smaller windows on a higher rising door panel. A few years ago, I test drove a 2SS when I was considering what my next track build was going to be, and I couldn't get past the interior sardine feel it gave me. I recognize that I'm taller than probably 90% of all human beings, so the sight issues are more pronounced for me, because to fit in the car I have to recline back in the seat a good long way, and the further back you recline, the more difficult it is to see out of things in your periphery due to how ye olde neck works. In the Challenger, I can sit just slightly reclined in a normal driving posture. I can't do this in a Camaro or a Mustang.

I personally wouldn't buy a new Camaro. Given that the 2023 model year is the last, the availability of aftermarket Camaro specific parts is going to get scarce and will be entirely dependent upon what Chevrolet does to change the design for its sendoff year refresh. The 6th gen as a whole are unpopular to begin with, regardless of their fine performance credentials. So, if you're into customizing at all, you'll still be able to do it, but you'll pay a lot more in the process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You're comparing watermelons to croissants with this comparison. To put it simply, there isn't a comparison.

I belong to a car club where we race out of a few local tracks (within about 200 miles of us). One of our members has a Z28. And, part of the deal with our club is that we routinely swap keys. I've driven his Z28 probably 50 times over 3 years, maybe 100 laps or so. He's gotten to drive my Esprit, Hellcat, and GT350. Now, a good comparison is the GT350 vs the Z28. They're both relatively lightweight, track focused, RWD, NA corner carvers. A Challenger Hellcat is none of these things.

A Hellcat can carve corners... about as well as a goldfish can go down a flight of stairs on its own. It has no poise, no graceful entries/exits. It's a brute. I own a Hellcat and I know full well just how borderline graceless my 'Cat is on a road course. Both the Z28 and GT350 are very predictable on turn-in, with solid transitions to the apex and egress. Rolling on power in these cars is no issue. In theory, I could do some work to the Hellcat and get it to handle track work better, but I don't buy a new set of flip-flops and go run a 100m dash. I'd just buy a proper set of running shoes... which is also why I own a proper track car.

Now, let's look at what happens on a double left/right chicane in a Hellcat. Lots of tracks like to put these after a short straight. So, in a Hellcat, you're likely pushing 100mph or so, and to slow for the turn, you angle the car to the outside and brake. Braking is one of this car's 2 only positives on a road track. The brakes bite nicely, but as you turn in towards the apex, imagine a snowplow blowing through 4 feet of snow. It's heavy and the oversteer is real. The rear end would love nothing more than to come on around too. Even with the suspension dialed in to track, there's enough body roll to induce sea sickness if you're squeamish. Right, left slosh to the side, and back to the right as you plow your way through the turns. Now, it's time to roll on the power and accelerate out.

Even with Goodyear track tires on the car, you still have to be mindful of dropping the hammer and your track poise ends up being very similar to spirited driving on the street. Too much gas and the Hellcat goes up in smoke, thus reducing your E/T. Where it does shine though, for perk numero dos is its straightaway speed. No other car at the track, sans any super cars out that day, are going to put up top speeds like the Hellcat will. Buuuuut, there's a downside. All good straights come to an and, then it's back to snowplowing and body rolling.

It's really great fun. But it's really kinda slow, all things told.

The GT350 and the Z28 both will murder a Hellcat on a closed track. So, for pure performance output on a track, Hellcat is not my tool of choice. It's not even in my top 20.

Now, for off-track use, it's Hellcat all day, every day. I daily drive mine. It's larger, more comfortable, it's perfectly civilized for street work. The Z28 and Shelby... not so much. I can only stomach driving a Z28 for about 15 minutes before every fiber of my being wants out of the car. It's cramped, ultra rigid, loud road noise, and I can't see out of the damn thing... and I'm 6'5". I've driven the Z28 from northern Alabama to central Florida in one day's jaunt back from the race track. It was only supposed to be from N. AL to Birmingham where we were supposed to swap keys again, but noooo. My buddy refused and left me at the gas station before I could swap with him, so I got stuck in the damn Z28 the rest of the way. I tried to catch up to him, but my Hellcat put 3-5 miles on me in his Z28 and he stopped answering my calls. Thankfully I knew where the lamer lived... and he owns 2 Ferraris, so if he screwed up my car, I'd have taken his 488 Pista for a grand tour of the eastern seaboard.

He and I both agreed, once we reached home, that my Hellcat and his Z28 are no more related than battleships are to chopsticks. In the Z28, you feel every concrete spacer on the interstate... thump-thump-thump-thump x 160 miles. But, regardless what that 35mph exit speed sign says, the Z28 can do it at 80. My Hellcat, I'm feeling saucy at 55-60. The Z28 drives and feels like a go-cart. Only the engine is in the front and the go-cart offers better visibility and has a more comfortable seat. My Hellcat, with all of its 717 fire breathing horsepuppies and SRT whatsits and doo-dads, it handles the open road like a yacht cruising on a lake with, "I'm on a boat!" blaring everywhere you go. It has the feel of plush captain's chairs, a commanding view forward and to the sides (we don't talk about a yacht's blind spots). Plus, when I need to lay the smack down on someone, I am in fact driving the automobile equivalent of the Yamato. Accept no substitute, but the Hellcat is the king of the road in this comparison (in almost every comparison, for that matter). You just can't beat a car that's comfortable, poised, civilized, that's also mated to a screaming 717hp supercharged engine. Many cars can be comfortable, but they're usually slow. Many cars can be top performers, but they're really not good to spend time in (Z28, my Elise, any of the new 911s). But, the Hellcat is both in a straight line. It's FUN in the corners, but only because fishtailing and throwing screaming supercharger induced tire smoke 20x per lap is FUN. It's slow, but it's FUN. Did I mention that the Hellcat's trunk is gigantic? Again, if you're going to use it for things people use cars for, the Hellcat can do it all.

So, in summary. The Z28 is a track toy. It's misery everywhere else. Even the owner of said Z28 agrees. Off the track, it is eclipsed in every way by the ZL1... and the Z28 was more expensive (original MSRP anyway). If you want to develop a walk that looks like you just got off your trusty horse after a long day's riding on the range, try and daily drive a Z28. In a couple days' time you'll age your legs and spine by 15 years and gain an addiction to ranch beans and harmonica tunes. The Hellcat, you can drive it for 8-10 hours and feel RESTED when you get out.

That's all I have to say about that.


Very nice well said. I appreciate the long detailed write up. I’m pretty familiar with both cars as well especially a 717 Cat since I own one but only know the Z28 from research and what people say about them. They do look pretty sick and beastly and love the Z28 seats. It’s pretty cool you’re able to track several cars and have fun with them as well as get to know them. A lot of people have mentioned the Z28 is special in which it is. They say the car is a raw driver’s car.

Our Hellcats are raw as well with that aggressive sounding exhaust and whine. It has a lot of street presence and looks dominate. Which of these two cars would you say is more raw sounding/ feel to them if that makes sense?

Also I’m sure you and your buddy have raced each other in a straight line in both cars if so how much of a gap did you put on the Z28? IF you both haven’t raced, since you driven both does the Cat feel much faster than the Z28 S.O.T.P feel?

I’m assuming it does when comparing 717 hp to 505 hp but just curious to know in terms of power feel between the two in the straights. Is the Z28 much slower? Is it also really that rough riding on the street? Maybe you had the Trofeo r tires that come with it or even if you swapped the tires for more daily driver friendly ones like Contis or Michelins it would be much improved?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So, the 5th Gen Camaro (outside of the ZL1) are all fairly slow cars in stock form period. They're just not going to compare to a Hellcat in a straight line. Xylander hit on this a few times in his post. The only place the Z28 would dominate the Hellcat is when you turn left or right, and it's showed that on the track against the GT500 who had like 150 more hp...

Now, where I will disagree with Xylander is on this..




The cars are practically identical in length, height, interior dimensions etc...
Camaro = 190.4 inches long, 75.5 inches wide, 54.2 inches height
Challenger = 198 inches long, 76 inches wide, 57-58 inches height

About the only big difference on the interior is about 1.5 inches of headroom that does favor the Challenger. They all have the same blind spots, they all have the same issues in terms of visibility. The Challenger gets the nod "just" at being bigger, but it's also about a good 15 inches longer when you factor in the body panels/bumpers.

The Z28 was a pure track car, it is not something I would ever recommend as a daily driver. In fact, I would actually recommend buying a newer 6th Gen 1LE SS Camaro as it dusts the Z28 even with less HP.


How slow is the Z28 compared to the Hellcat? I know the 5th gen ZL1 has the supercharger and more power (580 HP) and the Z28 with the N/A LS7 has the 505 HP but a few hundred pounds lighter than the ZL1 in which I have heard from some folks that both cars felt about as fast as eachother in a straight line S.O.T.P feel. Would you agree or is the 5th gen ZL1 faster stock for stock?

I do remember a while back when looking at the 6th gen SS 1LE. As cool as the alpha chassis is and the updated interior, tech, and rev matching. It looked and felt too small for my liking. It’s a nice looking car but when then seeing the Z28 in person it was quite a sight. I was attracted to the bigger size of the vehicle and how raw and beastly the car looks, obviously it has more of a stripped out interior and less daily driver amenities but still.

I may have heard the Z28 or even the 5th gen ZL1 is a driver’s race with a 6th gen ss and I wonder if that’s true but I could not find any videos of both cars stock doing pulls against each other. If anything 6th gen it would only be the LT4 ZL1 I'd favor but that Z28 just looks so raw and muscle car like and at times it’s tempting to have a second fun car especially with a manual.
 

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Very nice well said. I appreciate the long detailed write up. I’m pretty familiar with both cars as well especially a 717 Cat since I own one but only know the Z28 from research and what people say about them. They do look pretty sick and beastly and love the Z28 seats. It’s pretty cool you’re able to track several cars and have fun with them as well as get to know them. A lot of people have mentioned the Z28 is special in which it is. They say the car is a raw driver’s car.

Also I’m sure you and your buddy have raced each other in a straight line in both cars if so how much of a gap did you put on the Z28? IF you both haven’t raced, since you driven both does the Cat feel much faster than the Z28 S.O.T.P feel?

I’m assuming it does when comparing 717 hp to 505 hp but just curious to know in terms of power feel between the two in the straights. Is the Z28 much slower? Is it also really that rough riding on the street? Maybe you had the Trofeo r tires that come with it or even if you swapped the tires for more daily driver friendly ones like Contis or Michelins it would be much improved?
As to the Z28's ride quality, what makes it a raw driver's car is what makes it a horrible A>>>B car. For example, the rear glass is thinner, the back seats are removed, and they remove a lot of the sound deadening material to save for weight. The suspension is ultra rigid. All of this makes for a very rough ride that is also exceedingly loud. About the best comparison I can give is that the ride quality is similar to a Harley Sportster. You get fatigued fairly quickly. I would say that the Ferrari 488 PIsta (track focused variant of the 488) is outdone by the Z28 in terms of its road harshness. But, we're talking a $300,000+ car vs an $80,000 car, so I won't go much deeper into it than that.

In a straight line contest vs. a Hellcat, it's only a driver's race if the Hellcat driver is on a test drive and they've spent their life driving a Plymouth Voyager. Per spec, the Hellcat is nearly a second faster, 0-60 and almost 2 seconds faster to 1,320ft. From a dig, the Z28 may win to 60ft, but the Hellcat will pull on it for days. Straight line performance-wise, the Z28 is more closer matched to a Mustang GT than it is to a Hellcat. Any race can be a driver's race, but it really takes the Hellcat to have to suffer a mechanical failure or a major driving error for it to not pull 5-6 car lengths on a Z28/Mustang/GT350 in short order. The Z28 is lighter, but it is missing a lot of torque and horsepower, too. In terms of "feel," the Camaro always feels fast, mainly because you feel everything and you're lower to the ground. But, there is a night and day difference of speed feel in the Hellcat when you're powering through 4,000 RPM on up past 6,000. You don't get the road noise the Z28 imparts, in contrast, it's deceptively peaceful. What you do get though, is just shy of 700 lb/ft of torque jamming you into the seat and the feel pushes ever harder, the higher the RPMs rise. If we're talking stock for stock, the Hellcat can do to a Z28, what a Z28 can do to a Nissan Maxima.

For fun, here's an old guy in a Hellcat vs. a modified C6 Corvette. I imagine a race with a Z28 looks familiar. As the Hellcat gets into its powerband, it just yanks and pulls away.

 

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Disagree. The door height is much higher on the Camaro. While the Camaro has similar leg room for length, it has much narrower width. In my car, I can "man spread" to the point where my left foot is on the dead pedal and my right knee is barely touching the center console.
You're certainly welcome to your opinion here, but I have owned both cars (5th gen Camaro/Challenger). I'm also 6'3" and have large feet which screws with my leg room. I'm telling you right now that the cars are virtually the same. Now, it may feel different to you, because of how you sit or what not, but the specs simply do not back up your view point.

Camaro
Front Head Room 37.4 in
Front Leg Room 42.4 in
Front Should Room 56.9 in

Challenger
Front Head Room 39.3 in
Front Leg Room 42 in
Front Shoulder Room 58.5 in

Yes, the Challenger is slightly bigger. I never said it wasnt. However, it's not anywhere close to being drastically narrow. If you were talking about a 6th Gen Camaro, you would be 10000% correct. However, the 5th Gen cars are basically within 2 inches of every dimension of the Challenger. To say it's much smaller or cramped is just factually incorrect.


So, the cars don't have the same blind spots. The rear visibility on the Challenger is much better. The side-to-side visibility is much better (again, higher doors. This is what gives the Camaro the "bunker port" view that many folks, me included, dislike). Although the Camaro has the pony car style center "bubble" for headroom, it slopes down towards the door and you're left with smaller windows on a higher rising door panel. A few years ago, I test drove a 2SS when I was considering what my next track build was going to be, and I couldn't get past the interior sardine feel it gave me. I recognize that I'm taller than probably 90% of all human beings, so the sight issues are more pronounced for me, because to fit in the car I have to recline back in the seat a good long way, and the further back you recline, the more difficult it is to see out of things in your periphery due to how ye olde neck works. In the Challenger, I can sit just slightly reclined in a normal driving posture. I can't do this in a Camaro or a Mustang.
The Mustang, the Camaro, and the Challenger all have the SAME exact blind spots. Now, in the newer Camaro/Mustang, they are worse than the current Challenger, we'll agree there. In the older 5th Gen Camaro/previous gen Mustang, they were fairly similar. Most are easily addressed by proper mirror placement, but your height can and does play a factor in it. I never had issues with either my 5th gen or 6th gen car. However, I knew many who did. I knew many who had the same issues in the Mustang and Challenger. Honestly, I almost feel like your mistaking the 6th Gen for the 5th Gen in some of these comments.

I personally wouldn't buy a new Camaro. Given that the 2023 model year is the last, the availability of aftermarket Camaro specific parts is going to get scarce and will be entirely dependent upon what Chevrolet does to change the design for its sendoff year refresh. The 6th gen as a whole are unpopular to begin with, regardless of their fine performance credentials. So, if you're into customizing at all, you'll still be able to do it, but you'll pay a lot more in the process.
The Camaro was extended beyond 2023 (2026), but I will agree with the premise here. The 6th Gen car, despite being the best performing, fastest, etc Camaro... has struggled due to limited discounts and overpriced cars. Additionally, lots of people were disappointed with the continuation of the 5th gen look. Regardless, the car is a hell of a performance vehicle and it would certainly be a better choice in SS 1LE or ZL1 form instead of a 5th Gen Z28.
 

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How slow is the Z28 compared to the Hellcat? I know the 5th gen ZL1 has the supercharger and more power (580 HP) and the Z28 with the N/A LS7 has the 505 HP but a few hundred pounds lighter than the ZL1 in which I have heard from some folks that both cars felt about as fast as eachother in a straight line S.O.T.P feel. Would you agree or is the 5th gen ZL1 faster stock for stock?
Well, compare a Scatpack (not 1320 model) to a Hellcat and that's basically where you are in terms of how slow/fast they are. The ZL1 is faster in a straight line than the Z28, but only just. However, that ZL1 rear diff is practically bulletproof in stock form so the car handles significant power increases.


I may have heard the Z28 or even the 5th gen ZL1 is a driver’s race with a 6th gen ss and I wonder if that’s true but I could not find any videos of both cars stock doing pulls against each other. If anything 6th gen it would only be the LT4 ZL1 I'd favor but that Z28 just looks so raw and muscle car like and at times it’s tempting to have a second fun car especially with a manual.
It's true, it's been shown in terms of performance in multiple tests even if the cars arent being done head to head. The base ZL1 is a beast in 6th Gen form and the 1LE model is even MORE aggressive regardless of either 6spd or 10spd variety. The 1LE is also a very harsh ride, but not nearly as bad as the previous Z28.
 

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You're comparing watermelons to croissants with this comparison. To put it simply, there isn't a comparison.

I belong to a car club where we race out of a few local tracks (within about 200 miles of us). One of our members has a Z28. And, part of the deal with our club is that we routinely swap keys. I've driven his Z28 probably 50 times over 3 years, maybe 100 laps or so. He's gotten to drive my Esprit, Hellcat, and GT350. Now, a good comparison is the GT350 vs the Z28. They're both relatively lightweight, track focused, RWD, NA corner carvers. A Challenger Hellcat is none of these things.

A Hellcat can carve corners... about as well as a goldfish can go down a flight of stairs on its own. It has no poise, no graceful entries/exits. It's a brute. I own a Hellcat and I know full well just how borderline graceless my 'Cat is on a road course. Both the Z28 and GT350 are very predictable on turn-in, with solid transitions to the apex and egress. Rolling on power in these cars is no issue. In theory, I could do some work to the Hellcat and get it to handle track work better, but I don't buy a new set of flip-flops and go run a 100m dash. I'd just buy a proper set of running shoes... which is also why I own a proper track car.

Now, let's look at what happens on a double left/right chicane in a Hellcat. Lots of tracks like to put these after a short straight. So, in a Hellcat, you're likely pushing 100mph or so, and to slow for the turn, you angle the car to the outside and brake. Braking is one of this car's 2 only positives on a road track. The brakes bite nicely, but as you turn in towards the apex, imagine a snowplow blowing through 4 feet of snow. It's heavy and the oversteer is real. The rear end would love nothing more than to come on around too. Even with the suspension dialed in to track, there's enough body roll to induce sea sickness if you're squeamish. Right, left slosh to the side, and back to the right as you plow your way through the turns. Now, it's time to roll on the power and accelerate out.

Even with Goodyear track tires on the car, you still have to be mindful of dropping the hammer and your track poise ends up being very similar to spirited driving on the street. Too much gas and the Hellcat goes up in smoke, thus reducing your E/T. Where it does shine though, for perk numero dos is its straightaway speed. No other car at the track, sans any super cars out that day, are going to put up top speeds like the Hellcat will. Buuuuut, there's a downside. All good straights come to an and, then it's back to snowplowing and body rolling.

It's really great fun. But it's really kinda slow, all things told.

The GT350 and the Z28 both will murder a Hellcat on a closed track. So, for pure performance output on a track, Hellcat is not my tool of choice. It's not even in my top 20.

Now, for off-track use, it's Hellcat all day, every day. I daily drive mine. It's larger, more comfortable, it's perfectly civilized for street work. The Z28 and Shelby... not so much. I can only stomach driving a Z28 for about 15 minutes before every fiber of my being wants out of the car. It's cramped, ultra rigid, loud road noise, and I can't see out of the damn thing... and I'm 6'5". I've driven the Z28 from northern Alabama to central Florida in one day's jaunt back from the race track. It was only supposed to be from N. AL to Birmingham where we were supposed to swap keys again, but noooo. My buddy refused and left me at the gas station before I could swap with him, so I got stuck in the damn Z28 the rest of the way. I tried to catch up to him, but my Hellcat put 3-5 miles on me in his Z28 and he stopped answering my calls. Thankfully I knew where the lamer lived... and he owns 2 Ferraris, so if he screwed up my car, I'd have taken his 488 Pista for a grand tour of the eastern seaboard.

He and I both agreed, once we reached home, that my Hellcat and his Z28 are no more related than battleships are to chopsticks. In the Z28, you feel every concrete spacer on the interstate... thump-thump-thump-thump x 160 miles. But, regardless what that 35mph exit speed sign says, the Z28 can do it at 80. My Hellcat, I'm feeling saucy at 55-60. The Z28 drives and feels like a go-cart. Only the engine is in the front and the go-cart offers better visibility and has a more comfortable seat. My Hellcat, with all of its 717 fire breathing horsepuppies and SRT whatsits and doo-dads, it handles the open road like a yacht cruising on a lake with, "I'm on a boat!" blaring everywhere you go. It has the feel of plush captain's chairs, a commanding view forward and to the sides (we don't talk about a yacht's blind spots). Plus, when I need to lay the smack down on someone, I am in fact driving the automobile equivalent of the Yamato. Accept no substitute, but the Hellcat is the king of the road in this comparison (in almost every comparison, for that matter). You just can't beat a car that's comfortable, poised, civilized, that's also mated to a screaming 717hp supercharged engine. Many cars can be comfortable, but they're usually slow. Many cars can be top performers, but they're really not good to spend time in (Z28, my Elise, any of the new 911s). But, the Hellcat is both in a straight line. It's FUN in the corners, but only because fishtailing and throwing screaming supercharger induced tire smoke 20x per lap is FUN. It's slow, but it's FUN. Did I mention that the Hellcat's trunk is gigantic? Again, if you're going to use it for things people use cars for, the Hellcat can do it all.

So, in summary. The Z28 is a track toy. It's misery everywhere else. Even the owner of said Z28 agrees. Off the track, it is eclipsed in every way by the ZL1... and the Z28 was more expensive (original MSRP anyway). If you want to develop a walk that looks like you just got off your trusty horse after a long day's riding on the range, try and daily drive a Z28. In a couple days' time you'll age your legs and spine by 15 years and gain an addiction to ranch beans and harmonica tunes. The Hellcat, you can drive it for 8-10 hours and feel RESTED when you get out.

That's all I have to say about that.
I have a ZL1 1LE and a WB Redeye Challenger. Your assessment is spot on! They make a great combo but are vastly different, about the only thing the same is the amount of smiles per mile they provide.
 

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2021 widebody Redeye Pitch Black.
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You're comparing watermelons to croissants with this comparison. To put it simply, there isn't a comparison.

I belong to a car club where we race out of a few local tracks (within about 200 miles of us). One of our members has a Z28. And, part of the deal with our club is that we routinely swap keys. I've driven his Z28 probably 50 times over 3 years, maybe 100 laps or so. He's gotten to drive my Esprit, Hellcat, and GT350. Now, a good comparison is the GT350 vs the Z28. They're both relatively lightweight, track focused, RWD, NA corner carvers. A Challenger Hellcat is none of these things.

A Hellcat can carve corners... about as well as a goldfish can go down a flight of stairs on its own. It has no poise, no graceful entries/exits. It's a brute. I own a Hellcat and I know full well just how borderline graceless my 'Cat is on a road course. Both the Z28 and GT350 are very predictable on turn-in, with solid transitions to the apex and egress. Rolling on power in these cars is no issue. In theory, I could do some work to the Hellcat and get it to handle track work better, but I don't buy a new set of flip-flops and go run a 100m dash. I'd just buy a proper set of running shoes... which is also why I own a proper track car.

Now, let's look at what happens on a double left/right chicane in a Hellcat. Lots of tracks like to put these after a short straight. So, in a Hellcat, you're likely pushing 100mph or so, and to slow for the turn, you angle the car to the outside and brake. Braking is one of this car's 2 only positives on a road track. The brakes bite nicely, but as you turn in towards the apex, imagine a snowplow blowing through 4 feet of snow. It's heavy and the oversteer is real. The rear end would love nothing more than to come on around too. Even with the suspension dialed in to track, there's enough body roll to induce sea sickness if you're squeamish. Right, left slosh to the side, and back to the right as you plow your way through the turns. Now, it's time to roll on the power and accelerate out.

Even with Goodyear track tires on the car, you still have to be mindful of dropping the hammer and your track poise ends up being very similar to spirited driving on the street. Too much gas and the Hellcat goes up in smoke, thus reducing your E/T. Where it does shine though, for perk numero dos is its straightaway speed. No other car at the track, sans any super cars out that day, are going to put up top speeds like the Hellcat will. Buuuuut, there's a downside. All good straights come to an and, then it's back to snowplowing and body rolling.

It's really great fun. But it's really kinda slow, all things told.

The GT350 and the Z28 both will murder a Hellcat on a closed track. So, for pure performance output on a track, Hellcat is not my tool of choice. It's not even in my top 20.

Now, for off-track use, it's Hellcat all day, every day. I daily drive mine. It's larger, more comfortable, it's perfectly civilized for street work. The Z28 and Shelby... not so much. I can only stomach driving a Z28 for about 15 minutes before every fiber of my being wants out of the car. It's cramped, ultra rigid, loud road noise, and I can't see out of the damn thing... and I'm 6'5". I've driven the Z28 from northern Alabama to central Florida in one day's jaunt back from the race track. It was only supposed to be from N. AL to Birmingham where we were supposed to swap keys again, but noooo. My buddy refused and left me at the gas station before I could swap with him, so I got stuck in the damn Z28 the rest of the way. I tried to catch up to him, but my Hellcat put 3-5 miles on me in his Z28 and he stopped answering my calls. Thankfully I knew where the lamer lived... and he owns 2 Ferraris, so if he screwed up my car, I'd have taken his 488 Pista for a grand tour of the eastern seaboard.

He and I both agreed, once we reached home, that my Hellcat and his Z28 are no more related than battleships are to chopsticks. In the Z28, you feel every concrete spacer on the interstate... thump-thump-thump-thump x 160 miles. But, regardless what that 35mph exit speed sign says, the Z28 can do it at 80. My Hellcat, I'm feeling saucy at 55-60. The Z28 drives and feels like a go-cart. Only the engine is in the front and the go-cart offers better visibility and has a more comfortable seat. My Hellcat, with all of its 717 fire breathing horsepuppies and SRT whatsits and doo-dads, it handles the open road like a yacht cruising on a lake with, "I'm on a boat!" blaring everywhere you go. It has the feel of plush captain's chairs, a commanding view forward and to the sides (we don't talk about a yacht's blind spots). Plus, when I need to lay the smack down on someone, I am in fact driving the automobile equivalent of the Yamato. Accept no substitute, but the Hellcat is the king of the road in this comparison (in almost every comparison, for that matter). You just can't beat a car that's comfortable, poised, civilized, that's also mated to a screaming 717hp supercharged engine. Many cars can be comfortable, but they're usually slow. Many cars can be top performers, but they're really not good to spend time in (Z28, my Elise, any of the new 911s). But, the Hellcat is both in a straight line. It's FUN in the corners, but only because fishtailing and throwing screaming supercharger induced tire smoke 20x per lap is FUN. It's slow, but it's FUN. Did I mention that the Hellcat's trunk is gigantic? Again, if you're going to use it for things people use cars for, the Hellcat can do it all.

So, in summary. The Z28 is a track toy. It's misery everywhere else. Even the owner of said Z28 agrees. Off the track, it is eclipsed in every way by the ZL1... and the Z28 was more expensive (original MSRP anyway). If you want to develop a walk that looks like you just got off your trusty horse after a long day's riding on the range, try and daily drive a Z28. In a couple days' time you'll age your legs and spine by 15 years and gain an addiction to ranch beans and harmonica tunes. The Hellcat, you can drive it for 8-10 hours and feel RESTED when you get out.

That's all I have to say about that.
This is an awesome writeup, you should work for a car magazine!!!
 

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Totally different cars. From a performance standpoint, the Z28 will smoke a Hellcat on a road course. The Hellcat would smoke the Z28 on a dragstrip. The 6th Gen ZL1 is the best of both worlds, as quick as a Hellcat at the dragstrip and as quick as a Z28 on a road course. The Z28 can be a monster when modified though.
 
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