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Unless someone's got something bad to say (specifically) about them, for my money, I'll go with what is currently the line 18, PZero's, a bit wider, only 1lb heavier, one speed rating loss that shouldn't be a concern and 1/2 the price of the "true OEM" tires...
 

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Does anyone have experience with TOYO Proxes R888?

And would size 285/35ZR20 work on stock wheels?
No experience with them but that size will fit the stock wheels. Out back, right?
 

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Demon build date: 2/17/2018 #1531 - My Shy Girl
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I'd recommend the 555 G2 instead of the 555R for street use. The 555R has 5/32 tread depth (good for drag strip) vs the 555 G2 has 11/32 tread and will last longer.

555R is rated for 149mph
555 G2 is rated for 168mph
Thank you
 

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I'd recommend the 555 G2 instead of the 555R for street use. The 555R has 5/32 tread depth (good for drag strip) vs the 555 G2 has 11/32 tread and will last longer.

555R is rated for 149mph
555 G2 is rated for 168mph
I ordered a set of these last night. Will post and update once I've given them a good test.
 

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Does anyone have experience with TOYO Proxes R888?

And would size 285/35ZR20 work on stock wheels?
Those will fit on all 4s with the stock wheels. The Nittos in 285/35 also fit.
 

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Demon build date: 2/17/2018 #1531 - My Shy Girl
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I'd recommend the 555 G2 instead of the 555R for street use. The 555R has 5/32 tread depth (good for drag strip) vs the 555 G2 has 11/32 tread and will last longer.

555R is rated for 149mph
555 G2 is rated for 168mph
Thanks for the advice Rayzazoo - by time I read the post I had already had the Nitto NT 555R installed 275-40-20 front and 305-35-20 rear.
Love the way the car sticks when hitting it at 35/45MPH with Pirelli's I would do rolling burn-outs the Nitto's stick. Since most of my NY driving is <150 MPH I shouldn't have a problem with the tire MPH rating. Stop light to stop light driving the tires still spin but seems like a more controlled spin. Thanks for all your insights and advice.
 

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What's the specs on 305/35r20. Mt DR et ss??

What are they speed rated for and how will they perform in everyday driving conditions???

If u have these can u post a pick??
 

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DRIVESRT.COM
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Discussion Starter #48

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I've added both 275 and 305 on the Google sheets doc in post #1.

More specs here:

Mickey Thompson Performance Tires & Wheels
Thanks for compiling all this info Rayzazoo. I have a quick question for any of the tire experts out there. When I look at this spreadsheet and particularly Column F for "Tread Width" comparisons it gets interesting.
Is a Nitto 555 G2's (275/40/20) tread width really nearly 2" wider (10.94" vs 9") than our same size Pirrelli All-Season stocker's?? Maybe its just not an "apples to apples" comparison with the way manufacturers report this statistic, as this variability seems pretty large. (but would gladly take it if true!)
 

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Is a Nitto 555 G2's (275/40/20) tread width really nearly 2" wider (10.94" vs 9") than our same size Pirrelli All-Season stocker's?? Maybe its just not an "apples to apples" comparison with the way manufacturers report this statistic, as this variability seems pretty large. (but would gladly take it if true!)
I believe the Nitto specs are really section width, not tread width. On the Nitto Web site they claim those numbers are "overall width" which would mean section width. Nitto does not list tread width on their Web site.
 

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A nice tidbit, the Bondurant Hellcats run 285/35/20 Goodyear Eagle F1s at all four corners. Those tires have a 100Y load rating.
 

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Also, another tidbit. Stock Pirelli PZero Nero (All Seasons) at 18500 miles. Tread depth at between 5/32-6/32nds on all four tires.
 

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Two hard track days on the OEM wheels wearing the 275/40's. Hardly any wear, they still look great, and they have consistently given nearly 1.1 lateral g's, while maintaining my confidence Pirelli has me covered as I exceed 150 mph every two minutes. Drive them to and from the track and then put them on the shelf for the next time I want to really rock my car on the race track.
 

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How come I can't get a speed rating on drag radials?? Please educate me!!! MT 305/35R20 et ss DR
 

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There is up to a 5% variation in tire size vs actual measured tire size. This goes for different tire manufacturers and different lines of tires for the same manufacturer. Tread width and section width are two different things. Section width is the width of the tire from sidewall to sidewall while inflated on the wheel.

Speed ratings were designed in Europe for the Autobahn. Speed ratings are assigned during tire testing, it means it can sustain a certain speed for a long duration without falling apart. (How structurally sound it is, how the tire dissapates heat ect.) The speed rating is not the "top speed" you can go, it is however something to keep in mind if driving high speed for long durations. There are 1000+HP cars all over that do 250mph on drag radials. Drag radials are designed for a short burst of high speed and then slowing down. They are not designed to be driven for 10 minutes straight at 160mph. Most of them aren't assigned speed ratings at all, but some like nitto, have a V speed rating. All that means is they were tested to see at what speed they could be driven at for a long period. It does not mean they are better or safer than a MT ET street.
As far as tire weight, yes it does mean performance. Anything under the suspension is unsprung weight and grows exponentially when rotating at high speeds. Technically with the street tires they are heavier because there is more "stuff" in them, which helps the tires hold up to the beating they get on the street with pot holes and what not. Now with competition tires, they are built solely on performance aspect. Take hoosier tires for example. They have huge disclaimers that say their tires are not for street use. The reason is they are so light (less stuff) that it is actually very dangerous to drive them on the street because even hitting a small rock that would normally be absorbed by the street tire can blow out a hoosier. They are not designed to take a beating other than a smooth track with no road debris.
As far as tire performance, if I had one I would run the Nitto NT05R or MT ET SS for drag, and for lateral traction I would run Nitto NT01, Goodyear Eagle F1 G2, michelin pilot sport cup, pirelli pzero corsa, ect. Yes competition tires start with less tread depth and this is for a reason. If you look at an all season tire or even a summer tire, there are sipes all over and tall tread blocks. Siped tread blocks do nothing more than allow it to be plyable and they move a lot and sway at high speeds. That's why if you look at a michelin super sport for example, they have those solid ribs to maximize the contact patch while still maintaining good wet traction. But when tires start at 5 or 7/32" of tread depth instead of the normal 10 like street tires, that means they are focused even more on performance rather than tire wear. Pick your poison. Bad traction or fast tire wear? I have some good threads to read through for more in depth info.
Last note, the specified rim with range that the tire manufacturers post in their site is based off of the given tire size and not the actual measured tire size. Our chart accounts for this and you can safely run a 295/35-20 or 295/40-20. MAX.
 

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There is up to a 5% variation in tire size vs actual measured tire size. This goes for different tire manufacturers and different lines of tires for the same manufacturer. Tread width and section width are two different things. Section width is the width of the tire from sidewall to sidewall while inflated on the wheel.

Speed ratings were designed in Europe for the Autobahn. Speed ratings are assigned during tire testing, it means it can sustain a certain speed for a long duration without falling apart. (How structurally sound it is, how the tire dissapates heat ect.) The speed rating is not the "top speed" you can go, it is however something to keep in mind if driving high speed for long durations. There are 1000+HP cars all over that do 250mph on drag radials. Drag radials are designed for a short burst of high speed and then slowing down. They are not designed to be driven for 10 minutes straight at 160mph. Most of them aren't assigned speed ratings at all, but some like nitto, have a V speed rating. All that means is they were tested to see at what speed they could be driven at for a long period. It does not mean they are better or safer than a MT ET street.
As far as tire weight, yes it does mean performance. Anything under the suspension is unsprung weight and grows exponentially when rotating at high speeds. Technically with the street tires they are heavier because there is more "stuff" in them, which helps the tires hold up to the beating they get on the street with pot holes and what not. Now with competition tires, they are built solely on performance aspect. Take hoosier tires for example. They have huge disclaimers that say their tires are not for street use. The reason is they are so light (less stuff) that it is actually very dangerous to drive them on the street because even hitting a small rock that would normally be absorbed by the street tire can blow out a hoosier. They are not designed to take a beating other than a smooth track with no road debris.
As far as tire performance, if I had one I would run the Nitto NT05R or MT ET SS for drag, and for lateral traction I would run Nitto NT01, Goodyear Eagle F1 G2, michelin pilot sport cup, pirelli pzero corsa, ect. Yes competition tires start with less tread depth and this is for a reason. If you look at an all season tire or even a summer tire, there are sipes all over and tall tread blocks. Siped tread blocks do nothing more than allow it to be plyable and they move a lot and sway at high speeds. That's why if you look at a michelin super sport for example, they have those solid ribs to maximize the contact patch while still maintaining good wet traction. But when tires start at 5 or 7/32" of tread depth instead of the normal 10 like street tires, that means they are focused even more on performance rather than tire wear. Pick your poison. Bad traction or fast tire wear? I have some good threads to read through for more in depth info.
Last note, the specified rim with range that the tire manufacturers post in their site is based off of the given tire size and not the actual measured tire size. Our chart accounts for this and you can safely run a 295/35-20 or 295/40-20. MAX.
Thank u, great write up!!!
 
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