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There is no good touch-up for wrap material. You just have to re-wrap if it bothers you. That, or just use a sharpie to blacken out the real paint color underneath. However, if the wrap is really bad, you'd be better off just taking it to a detailer to take it off and go to the original paint, or re-wrap it.
 

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If the car was ordered with 1, 2, or 3 satin panels from the factory they are painted, wrap is an aftermarket thing
I was confident they are a wrap, as i've seen numerous pictures of the wrap peeling up from the friction areas of the vents on the hood. I did not think FCA was using satin/matte paint on any body panels. Only area of the car where a satin paint is actually used was on certain wheels.

If i'm wrong - OP, you're even more screwed. There is no touching up that paint in a way that looks good. You'd need to wrap it and cover it, or respray. The easiest way to maintain a satin/matte look is with a wrap, honestly.
 

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2019 Pitch black Hellcat Redeye Wide body
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Once you get it touched up to your satisfaction I’d suggest Xpel’s stealth (satin) film to protect your paint. Satin is a nightmare to deal with once something goes wrong with it.
 

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'23 Redeye Jailbreak
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The paint on our cars is satin. This is a problem for touch ups. Satin finishes are a treatment applied over a usually matte surface. This gives it the semi-low gloss look. Because of that treatment, it is nigh impossible to correct with touch ups, paint markers, and so on.

Caution: I am NOT a professional P&B guy. So take what I'm about to say with a grain of salt and check with a pro to verify.

Most body shops will not even attempt to spot correct a satin finish. It's just about 100% guaranteed to not look good. From what my current body shop told me when I inquired about the process, they would have to shoot it with matte black, then spray the satin treatment over top... then finely sand it exactly how the rest of the car looks. They said it is just about impossible to do and will look so much worse. The only real remedy is to strip it and paint the whole part.

To which the guy said, "It's cheaper to order a new painted part from the factory than get a good body shop to strip, prep, paint, and finish the same part."

Given that, I have had some slight luck with repairing satin painted panels. Keep in mind that what I'm about to tell you is going to look like crap if you're a perfectionist:

I fixed a scratch on my roof. On the car on my profile. I dropped a pipe wrench on it by accident. It left about a 3 inch scratch right above the driver's head location. To fix it, I bought some rust-o-leum satin clear coat spray paint (see, this is going to look terrible). Then, I took a matte black generic paint touch up pen and colored in the bare metal. I wet sanded that with a 1,000 grit sandpaper GENTLY. Then, I marked off with masking tape absolutely everything but the scratch, I covered the entire car with blankets and brown paper. I then shot it with a heavy 3 coats of that satin clearcoat. I let it dry overnight then sanded it in an X pattern until it was smooth with the rest of the car. To blend it, I had to go out with the wet sanding a few inches on either side of the scratch to try and even it out.

From a distance, it looks great. But there are certain angles that, when viewed, it looks like there's an oily spot about 3x5" or so right smack in the middle of the roof. Do I think it looks like crap? Yes. I notice it every time I look at the car, but I'm probably the only person who does. It is cheaper than getting the entire top of the car resprayed though. So there's that. You'd never guess there was ever a scratch there... but instead, it looks like there's a permanent stain in the area.
 

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'23 Redeye Jailbreak
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I covered the entire car with blankets and brown paper. I then shot it with a heavy 3 coats of that satin clearcoat. I let it dry overnight then sanded it in an X pattern until it was smooth with the rest of the car. To blend it, I had to go out with the wet sanding a few inches on either side of the scratch to try and even it out.
To add to the above, I sprayed it heavy in 3 coats to build an adequate "pile." This gives room enough to sand without taking it all off. It's important to note that both the surface and the sandpaper were soaking wet. The amount of pressure you apply has to be ultra light and you have to painstakingly keep adding water to the sandpaper as you go. It probably took me an hour to gently buff that spot down even and spread it out.
 

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Challenger SRT 392
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So they only wrapped the Demon hood? Seems odd the more special car got a wrap, and the rest didn't.
Demon hood was painted satin black as were all other black hood Hellcats. No vinyl wrap hood that I ever heard of, they were all painted.


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Challenger SRT Hellcat
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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Wow - a lot of work!
My scratches consist of two thin lines (1-2 inches) and some pin head size dots.) I was hoping that a fine point Sharpie type solution would simply darken the "white" appearing metal underneath.

Brown Sleeve Grey Hood Automotive exterior
 

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Wow - a lot of work!
My scratches consist of two thin lines (1-2 inches) and some pin head size dots.) I was hoping that a fine point Sharpie type solution would simply darken the "white" appearing metal underneath.

View attachment 584297
That's the easiest solution. Just sharpie it in. However, sharpie doesn't last very long before it UV fades.
 
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