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Since there isnt any catch cans/ air oil separators that are “complicated” and non exist for dodges. I am willing to pay extremely high is someone can just find one that has this feature and has coolant running through it for winter months. Or if someone knows prefabrication and good at there work to create a product I desire please let me know. I know how simple it is to just unscrew it and dumb it but ever since my fathers overfilled (ofc the engine was problematic) i will pay top dollar for someone to create one specifically for a charger 392.
 

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Why the heck would you put it back the oil. Just burn it through the intake you’ll be better off. Hemi’s make a nasty tar like byproduct in the catch can.
 

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Why the heck would you put it back the oil. Just burn it through the intake you’ll be better off. Hemi’s make a nasty tar like byproduct in the catch can.
Isn't it just oil? The nasty part comes when it sits in the catch can for weeks or months.


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Check the WRX performance boards. There are a number of air/oil separators with coolant lines running through that dump back into the pan for those cars. You'd have to adapt one but they are out there. Those cars need AOSs because eating its own oil and carbon build up on the pistons and valves changes the flame pocket and plays havoc with ignition timing over time, to the point they are walnut blasting their pistons and valves every 30-40k miles when modified. IS it a huge issue? Jury is out but there is evidence that it hurts performance on those cars etc. The coolant lines are for winter months to keep condensation down since the oil is going back into the system.

FWIW the catch can on the passenger side is all you need for the 392 or HC. Yes it IS EASY to dump out and after having three challengers with one, Ive never seen one get close to overflowing between oil changes. Its really not an issue worth spending a fortune to get around. To each their own though.
 

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Since there isnt any catch cans/ air oil separators that are “complicated” and non exist for dodges. I am willing to pay extremely high is someone can just find one that has this feature and has coolant running through it for winter months. Or if someone knows prefabrication and good at there work to create a product I desire please let me know. I know how simple it is to just unscrew it and dumb it but ever since my fathers overfilled (ofc the engine was problematic) i will pay top dollar for someone to create one specifically for a charger 392.
Some Porsche engines came with (maybe still do) air oil separator with coolant flowing through. More than once I'd read about a failure and coolant ended up in the crankcase.

Best advice I can offer if you are worried about dealing with a catch can that might get too full due to some owner forgetting to check it often enough or some other problem my advice is to remove the catch can and go back to the factory setup.
 

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I see the value of eliminating the condensation, in theory.
However, part of how an oil catch can works is that it is far cooler than the inside of the engine.

Petroleum is divided into its components: gases, light products, such as napthalene, gasoline, diesel, kerosene, then heavier products such as bunker fuel, oil for lubrication, and asphalt by fractional distillation.
Fractional distillation heats and vaporizes much of the whole mass of petroleum, then how high it rises in a tower determines where it is scooped off when it coalesces. This is done until a relatively predictable list of components make up a given product, labeled, for example, as "gasoline."

Gasoline is not just one molecule, for example: C17H36, it, and petroleum in general, are a list of hydrocarbon molecules. Hydrocarbons are generally structured such that there is a string of carbons with two hydrogens on each side, plus two hydrogens in addition on the ends, so hydrocarbons take on the chemical name format of CxH(x+2)

But, anyway, I noticed in an engine, the black sludge that used to collect (as in solid black tarry pavement) was on the insides of my valve covers. Why there? Coolest part of the engine to which engine oil was exposed, so instead of staying liquefied in the oil flow, it had a chance to check out and stay somewhere because that spot was cool enough to allow it to fall below its threshold of liquefaction, or melting point.

Regarding how much water would collect in the catch can without external heating: If the can is heated to get rid of said water, then one of the functions of the catch can is inhibited, which is that of allowing the lower-on-the-petroleum-tower-totem-pole crud to have a place other than inside the intake tract to coalesce, as the intake tract before the blower and the catch can are both cooler than even the insides of the valve covers.

That is the one concern I would have regarding a heated catch can. Heating it enough that it is barely above the vaporization temperature of water would also discourage its function as a place where heavier crud could coalesce.

PS not all petroleum is lighter than water. If you go on the beach in Fort Lauderdale, and stick your hand under the sand while in the water, my experience was that most often it came back with spots of heavy black petroleum goo stuck to it.
 

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That the catch can is cool is part of the problem. Water vapor that would normally flow on to the intake condenses in the catch can and in doing so captures oil vapor. The oil vapor is present because the air oil separator in the valve cover is not perfect.

This blend of water and oil can accumulate and the risk is if the volume of this gets too great under some higher than normal G-force conditions this can pull out a slug of this stuff and could put the engine at risk of having one cylinder suffer from hydraulic lock.

With no catch can in the picture, easy to eliminate the condensation, at least some of the time. Drive the car in such a way the oil temperature gets over 212F. This boils the water out of the oil but of course any surface the water vapor comes into contact with that is not also 212F or hotter will turn the vapor back into liquid. Some have seen the "goo" that can collect under an oil filler cap. This is water vapor condensing back into water and in doing so capturing some oil vapor.

So one must continue to drive the car in such a way that all surfaces the water vapor comes in contact with are 212F or hotter. As I have mentioned before I can with some town driving (some 5 or more miles of it and provided the day is not that cool) I can get the oil temperature in my Hellcat to 231F. Even before this temperature is reached I like to believe the various surfaces the oil vapor comes in contact with are 212F or hotter. Ideally the A/C should not be on as this keeps the radiator fan off until the coolant temperature gets to in the case of my Hellcat it appears to be 217F.

With the A/C on and the fan running all the time this tends to cool down some engine surfaces mainly in this context the valve covers.

The oil gets hot, above 212F, and this ignores the lowering of the boiling point of water that results from the crankcase often being subjected to a low pressure most of the time, the water boils out of the oil and in water vapor form is carried out the through the crankcase ventilation system. Because the oil is hot and the air oil separator that it (along with the water vapor) passes through is also hot the oil vapor is removed while the water vapor continues on in vapor form.

If it is not feasible to drive the car in such a way to get the oil hot and on a semi regular basis then more frequent oil changes are called for. This obviously removes any water in the oil along with the oil.
 

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It reminds me of the pool of water that accumulates in most exhaust mufflers/resonators if the car is driven in cold weather, and just on starting and idling. Stainless exhaust systems FTW!
 
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