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Discussion Starter #1
I installed the z26 power stop carbon ceramic break pads today. Watched a bunch of videos thought would be super easy. It was actually a PIA. The pistons in the brembo brakes where a pain to get pushed back. I didn’t bleed the brakes. Maybe I should have? I don’t know. I thought they would easily slide in but they didn’t. Lots of prying and hammering. Is this normal? Got them in but man they where super tight
 

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Agreed, not normal. I did the Z26’s a few months ago and it was an easy swap. Used a pry bar to negotiate the pistons in using the old pads still in place on the rotor and done.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys. Haven’t driven it yet. Hoping my breaks don’t lock up on me. It seemed like the z26 powerstop pads where to thick to slide in. Pretty sure I got the correct pads according to website. This is what I got
 

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I have always removed the master cylinder cap and removed a little brake fluid and left the cap off, then pushed the pistons back in using the old brake pads and a large "C" clamp. Then install the new pads and top off the master and put the cap back on. After pumping the peddle a few times, I remove the cap and check the fluid level and add more brake fluid if needed. Since a liquid is not compressible ( basic principle of hydraulics), it is very difficult to push the pistons back in with the cap on, especially if the master cylinder is nearly full. If this were not true, your brakes would not work when you push the peddle.

Phil
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have always removed the master cylinder cap and removed a little brake fluid and left the cap off, then pushed the pistons back in using the old brake pads and a large "C" clamp. Then install the new pads and top off the master and put the cap back on. After pumping the peddle a few times, I remove the cap and check the fluid level and add more brake fluid if needed. Since a liquid is not compressible ( basic principle of hydraulics), it is very difficult to push the pistons back in with the cap on, especially if the master cylinder is nearly full. If this were not true, your brakes would not work when you push the peddle.

Phil
Thanks Phil. This is kind of what I figured. Though most stuff I watched no one did this and the new pads slid in easy. Not so much in my case. Passenger front brake did leak some brake fluid as I was pushing pistons back lol so I guess I bled them but not purposely
 

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If you have any leaking of fluid at the caliper you have some issue's with that caliper. Nothing should leak by those seals unless there is rust or a damaged seal.If they were hard going back in the problem sounds like rust issues.
 

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I installed the z26 power stop carbon ceramic break pads today. Watched a bunch of videos thought would be super easy. It was actually a PIA. The pistons in the brembo brakes where a pain to get pushed back. I didn’t bleed the brakes. Maybe I should have? I don’t know. I thought they would easily slide in but they didn’t. Lots of prying and hammering. Is this normal? Got them in but man they where super tight
Once I remove the pad, I rotate 90 degrees and use the old pad as a lever to push the pistons back in to the caliper. If no fluid has ever been added to the reservoir, no need to bleed or remove the MC Cap as the MC Cap is vented. Once the pads are installed, press on the brake pedal multiple times to extend the pistons on all calipers to correct operating position.

Some would say open the caliper bleeder screw while compressing the pistons so as not to push fluid back to the MC. This is a judgement call based on how clean your system is. On my cars, I have no issue pressing the pistons back in during a pad install.

You also don't mention lubricating all the steel plate contact points with a high-temp silicone lube.... hope you did cause it is never proper to install a dry brake job.

And I truly hope you torqued all the lug nuts.

Best!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Once I remove the pad, I rotate 90 degrees and use the old pad as a lever to push the pistons back in to the caliper. If no fluid has ever been added to the reservoir, no need to bleed or remove the MC Cap as the MC Cap is vented. Once the pads are installed, press on the brake pedal multiple times to extend the pistons on all calipers to correct operating position.

Some would say open the caliper bleeder screw while compressing the pistons so as not to push fluid back to the MC. This is a judgement call based on how clean your system is. On my cars, I have no issue pressing the pistons back in during a pad install.

You also don't mention lubricating all the steel plate contact points with a high-temp silicone lube.... hope you did cause it is never proper to install a dry brake job.

And I truly hope you torqued all the lug nuts.

Best!
Lugs nuts torqued to 111 lb/ft. I tried to put lube on steel plate but not sure how much actually stayed on with all the wiggling and jarring to get them bastards in there
 

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Lugs nuts torqued to 111 lb/ft. I tried to put lube on steel plate but not sure how much actually stayed on with all the wiggling and jarring to get them bastards in there
Lube on the edges of the steel plates and where the pistons contact should be fine. There should be some clearance between the edge of the steel plate and the caliper housing (wiggle room) to allow for heat expansion of the steel plate during braking. At operating temps, the steel plate has to still be able to move and slide.
 

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Seeing any fluid is a red flag. Brake fluid will also ruin the caliper paint where ever it comes in contact if you don’t quickly clean it off.
 

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the best way for push back break piston, first open break valve ventilation then push piston back otherwise back pressure it will effect ABS model.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Took it for drive yesterday. Few hard stops as recommended by brake pad manufacturer and they seemed to work just fine
 

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the best way for push back break piston, first open break valve ventilation then push piston back otherwise back pressure it will effect ABS model.
Not sure what you are saying here, but ABS Modulators are "Open Center" systems which means they do not block fluid flow until triggered by a wheel slip event.
 

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Pad swaps are always the 1st thing we do on our cars, charger was easy as was our C7, and M2. I'd have to say hardest so far has been our 991.1 since you have to pull the calipers VS just knocking out the retainer pins and swapping pads on the Brembos. A big flathead screwdriver and using the old pads to compress the pistons has always worked for me. I have an old c-clamp works great if the pistons are stubborn. I guess I'm confused how this was such a PITA for you, hopefully something isn't jammed up or going bad...
 

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Challenger SRT Hellcat Widebody
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You really should keep an eye on this. Make sure that the driver and passenger pads are wearing evenly and that you have no signs of fluid or air leaks. Leaking could be a sign of a damaged piston seal caused when pushing the piston back in. A damaged seal can be a major braking problem

Thanks Phil. This is kind of what I figured. Though most stuff I watched no one did this and the new pads slid in easy. Not so much in my case. Passenger front brake did leak some brake fluid as I was pushing pistons back lol so I guess I bled them but not purposely
 

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I swapped the front and rear pads on my redeye for Z26s. The fronts were the easiest I've ever done. All the previous cars I did required removal of the caliper. Not so on the Brembos. Super easy and super quick.
The only trouble I had was on the rears. Getting the new Power Stop pins in took a lot of hammering. The front caliper pins went in with some easy tapping. The rears required a lot more, and there wasn't near as much room to swing the hammer. The rear calipers are also angled such that the pads want to slide out as you're trying to line the holes up, hold the spring, and get the first pin started. Not overly difficult.......just required more patience than with the fronts.
 
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